Dawson County, Georgia

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Dawson County
Dawson County Courthouse in Dawsonville
Dawson County Courthouse in Dawsonville
Map of Georgia highlighting Dawson County
Location within the U.S. state of Georgia
Map of the United States highlighting Georgia
Georgia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 34°26′N 84°10′W / 34.44°N 84.17°W / 34.44; -84.17
Country United States
State Georgia
Founded1857
Named forWilliam Crosby Dawson
SeatDawsonville
Largest cityDawsonville
Area
 • Total214 sq mi (550 km2)
 • Land211 sq mi (550 km2)
 • Water3.6 sq mi (9 km2)  1.7%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2019)
26,108
 • Density106/sq mi (41/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district9th
Websitewww.dawsoncounty.org

Dawson County is a county located in the north-central portion of the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 22,330.[1] The county seat is Dawsonville.[2]

Dawson County is included in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area. Its natural resources include Amicalola Falls, the highest in Georgia and one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the state.

History

Dawson County was created on December 3, 1857, from Gilmer and Lumpkin Counties.[3] It is named for William Crosby Dawson, a U.S. Senator from Georgia.[4]

Civil War

The 1860s brought war and hardships to the people of Dawson County. Many men of Dawson County answered the call and went to fight in the Civil War. Several Confederate units were raised in Dawson County, including:

  • 21st Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Company E Concord Rangers
  • 22nd Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Company I, Dawson County Independents
  • 38th Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Company I (Wright's Legion), Dawson Farmers
  • 38th Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Company L (Wright's Legion)
  • 52nd Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, Company I

The 1st Georgia Infantry Battalion (Union), Companies B and C also was raised there.

After Civil War to present

The county is known in its long involvement in auto racing, which was established in the 20th century; many of the original NASCAR racers came from this area. Local racing skills are said to have been developed by men who ran moonshine down Highway 9, also known as Thunder Road, to Atlanta. Celebrations of Dawson County's history and of its "likker" involvement occur every October with the Moonshine Festival.

Locals have referred to Dawson County as the Moonshine Capital of the World. This title is claimed by many other areas, but is fiercely defended by residents of this area. They took advantage of its relative isolation and the ability to move so much moonshine to the larger cities, especially Atlanta, during the Prohibition era.

Education

Dawson County currently serves grades K-12. It has a total of seven schools - one for pre-K, four for grades K-5, one for grades 6–7, one for grades 8–9, and Dawson County High School (grades 10-12).

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 214 square miles (550 km2), of which 211 square miles (550 km2) are land and 3.6 square miles (9.3 km2) (1.7%) are covered by water.[5]

The county is located in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Portions of the mountain chain extend into the far northern and western portions of the county, with elevations around 3,500 ft. in this area.

Part of Lake Lanier is in the southeastern part of the county and the boundary lines with neighboring counties pass through the lake. The 729-ft (222-m) Amicalola Falls, are located in the county. The Amicalola Falls are the highest in Georgia, the tallest cascading waterfall east of the Mississippi River, and one of the Seven Natural Wonders of Georgia. The highest point in the county is Black Mountain, with an elevation of 3,600 feet (1,100 m). The Chestatee and Etowah Rivers flow through Dawson County.

The vast majority of Dawson County is located in the Etowah River subbasin of the ACT River Basin (Coosa-Tallapoosa River Basin). The southeastern tip of the county is located in the Upper Chattahoochee River subbasin of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, and a very small northern section of Dawson County is located in the Coosawattee River subbasin of the larger ACT River Basin.[6]

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Transportation

Major highways

Pedestrians and cycling

  • Springer Mountain Trail

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18603,856
18704,36913.3%
18805,83733.6%
18905,612−3.9%
19005,442−3.0%
19104,686−13.9%
19204,204−10.3%
19303,502−16.7%
19404,47927.9%
19503,712−17.1%
19603,590−3.3%
19703,6391.4%
19804,77431.2%
19909,42997.5%
200015,99969.7%
201022,33039.6%
Est. 201926,108[7]16.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2010-2019[1]

2000 census

As of the census[12] of 2010, 22,330 people, and 10,425 households, and 6,390 families were living in the county. The racial makeup of the county was 95.62% White, 0.5% African American, 0.4% Native American, 0.6% Asian, 1.6% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 4.1% of the population.

Of the 8,433 households, 21.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.7% were married couples living together, 9.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 24.2% were not families. About 19.7% of all households were made up of individuals living alone, and 6.5% of whom were 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61, and the average family size was 2.97.

In the county, the population was distributed as 5.7% under the age of 5, 6.5% at 5–9 years, 6.8% at 10–14 years, 6.0% at 15–19 years, 6.1% at 20–24 years, 5.7% at 25–29 years, 5.8% at 30–34 years, 6.6% at 35–39 years, 6.9% at 40–44 years, 8.1% at 45–49 years, 7.2% at 50–54 years, 7.0% at 55–59 years, 7.6% at 60–64 years, 6.0% at 65–69 years, 3.6% at 70–74 years, 2.4% at 75–79 years, 1.3% at 80–84 years, and 0.8% over age 85. The median age was 40.6 years - 11,164 were male and 11,166 were female.

The median income for a household in the county was estimated at $51,989, and for a family was estimated at $60,455. About 8.9% of families and 13.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.0% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.[13]

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 22,330 people, 8,433 households, and 6,390 families living in the county.[14] The population density was 105.9 inhabitants per square mile (40.9/km2). There were 10,425 housing units at an average density of 49.4 per square mile (19.1/km2).[15] The racial makeup of the county was 95.6% white, 0.6% Asian, 0.5% black or African American, 0.4% American Indian, 1.6% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 4.1% of the population.[14] In terms of ancestry, 18.9% were American, 18.8% were Irish, 14.7% were English, and 13.6% were German.[16]

Of the 8,433 households, 33.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.7% were married couples living together, 9.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 24.2% were non-families, and 19.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 2.97. The median age was 40.6 years.[14]

The median income for a household in the county was $51,128 and the median income for a family was $60,236. Males had a median income of $41,726 versus $31,978 for females. The per capita income for the county was $25,557. About 7.8% of families and 12.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.0% of those under age 18 and 5.3% of those age 65 or over.[17]

Cities and communities

Incorporated cities

Unincorporated communities

Private communities

Several large, gated, private communities function similar to a municipality, providing many municipal-type services that operate independently of county government.

  • Paradise Valley Resort (a private residential/recreational community)

Politics

Presidential elections results
Previous presidential elections results[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 83.8% 9,900 12.3% 1,448 4.0% 472
2012 86.2% 8,847 12.1% 1,241 1.7% 176
2008 82.5% 8,242 16.3% 1,632 1.1% 112
2004 81.9% 6,649 17.3% 1,407 0.8% 65
2000 71.4% 4,210 24.7% 1,458 3.9% 230
1996 54.4% 2,343 33.3% 1,434 12.3% 529
1992 43.6% 1,696 36.0% 1,399 20.5% 797
1988 71.0% 1,908 28.3% 761 0.6% 17
1984 67.3% 1,322 32.7% 643
1980 39.7% 729 58.4% 1,072 2.0% 36
1976 21.1% 370 78.9% 1,384
1972 78.3% 828 21.7% 230
1968 31.8% 509 15.4% 246 52.8% 845
1964 40.7% 639 59.3% 932
1960 30.5% 401 69.6% 916
1956 46.0% 613 54.1% 721
1952 37.9% 470 62.1% 770
1948 2.8% 42 44.4% 660 52.8% 786
1944 42.2% 342 57.8% 469
1940 36.2% 276 63.4% 484 0.4% 3
1936 46.1% 322 53.9% 377
1932 15.5% 105 83.9% 567 0.6% 4
1928 46.6% 290 53.4% 332
1924 48.4% 264 51.1% 279 0.6% 3
1920 58.2% 354 41.8% 254
1916 3.9% 29 59.3% 440 36.8% 273
1912 45.5% 161 48.0% 170 6.5% 23

Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved February 15, 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Krakow, Kenneth K. (1975). Georgia Place-Names: Their History and Origins (PDF). Macon, GA: Winship Press. p. 59. ISBN 0-915430-00-2.
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. pp. 101.
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  6. ^ "Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission Interactive Mapping Experience". Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission. Retrieved November 19, 2015.
  7. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 21, 2020.
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 21, 2014.
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 21, 2014.
  10. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 21, 2014.
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 21, 2014.
  12. ^ Bureau, U.S. Census. "American FactFinder - Results". factfinder2.census.gov.
  13. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on April 5, 2019. Retrieved November 21, 2013.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  14. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 29, 2015.
  15. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 29, 2015.
  16. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 29, 2015.
  17. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 29, 2015.
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 19, 2018.

External links

Coordinates: 34°26′N 84°10′W / 34.44°N 84.17°W / 34.44; -84.17

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