Hemispheres of Earth

Jump to navigation Jump to search
The division of Earth by the Equator and prime meridian

In geography and cartography, the hemispheres of Earth refer to any division of the globe into two hemispheres (from Ancient Greek ἡμισφαίριον hēmisphairion, meaning "half of a sphere").

The most common such divisions are by latitudinal or longitudinal markers[1]:

The East–West division can also be seen in a cultural sense, as a division into two cultural hemispheres.

However, other schemes have sought to divide the planet in a way that maximizes the preponderance of one geographic feature or another in each division:

  • Land–Water [2]
    • Land Hemisphere, the hemisphere on Earth containing the largest possible area of land
    • Water Hemisphere, the hemisphere on Earth containing the largest area of water
The Land Hemisphere
The Land Hemisphere
The Water Hemisphere
The Water Hemisphere
The Land Hemisphere is at the top, and the Water Hemisphere is at the bottom.
The Land Hemisphere is at the top, and the Water Hemisphere is at the bottom.
The Land Hemisphere is at the top and the Water Hemisphere is at the bottom
The Land Hemisphere is at the top and the Water Hemisphere is at the bottom

Earth may also be split into hemispheres of day and night by the terrestrial terminator.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Hemisphere". 2011-03-22.
  2. ^ Boggs, S. W. (1945). "This Hemisphere". Journal of Geography. 44 (9): 345–355. doi:10.1080/00221344508986498.

External links

Media related to Earth's hemispheres at Wikimedia Commons

The article is a derivative under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. A link to the original article can be found here and attribution parties here. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use. Gpedia Ⓡ is a registered trademark of the Cyberajah Pty Ltd.