List of U.S. states and territories by unemployment rate

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The list of U.S. states and territories by unemployment rate compares the seasonally adjusted unemployment rates by state and territory, sortable by name, rate, and change. Data are provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in its Geographic Profile of Employment and Unemployment publication.[1][2] While the non-seasonally adjusted data reflects the actual unemployment rate, the seasonally adjusted data removes time from the equation.[3]

Unemployment rate by jurisdiction

Data for all U.S. states, the District of Columbia[4] and Puerto Rico is from April 2020, data from the Virgin Islands is from December 2019, data for Guam is from September 2019, data for American Samoa is from 2018, and data for the Northern Mariana Islands is from April 2010. Because data for the Northern Mariana Islands is more than 5 years old, it is not ranked in the table below.

Rank Rank
(50 states)
State
federal district
or territory
Unemployment rate
(seasonally adjusted)
Monthly change (%)
(Positive decrease=drop in unemployment)
1 1  Nevada 28.2% Negative increase 21.9
2 2  Michigan 22.7% Negative increase 18.6
3 3  Hawaii 22.3% Negative increase 19.7
4 4  Rhode Island 17% Negative increase 12.4
5 5  Indiana 16.9% Negative increase 13.7
6 6  Ohio 16.8% Negative increase 11.3
7 7  Illinois 16.4% Negative increase 11.8
8 8  New Hampshire 16.3% Negative increase 13.7
9 9  Vermont 15.6% Negative increase 12.4
10 10  California 15.5% Negative increase 10.2
11 11  Kentucky 15.4% Negative increase 9.6
11 11  Mississippi 15.4% Negative increase 10.1
11 11  Washington 15.4% Negative increase 10.3
14 14  New Jersey 15.3% Negative increase 11.5
15 15  West Virginia 15.2% Negative increase 9.1
16 16  Massachusetts 15.1% Negative increase 12.2
16 16  Pennsylvania 15.1% Negative increase 9.1
18 18  Tennessee 14.7% Negative increase 11.2
19 19  Louisiana 14.5% Negative increase 7.6
19 19  New York 14.5% Negative increase 10
21 21  Delaware 14.3% Negative increase 9.2
22 22  Oregon 14.2% Negative increase 10.9
23 23  Wisconsin 14.1% Negative increase 10.7
24 24  Oklahoma 13.7% Negative increase 10.6
25 25  Alabama 12.9% Negative increase 9.4
25 25  Alaska 12.9% Negative increase 7.3
25 25  Florida 12.9% Negative increase 8.6
28 28  Texas 12.8% Negative increase 8.1
29 29  Arizona 12.6% Negative increase 7.1
30 30  North Carolina 12.2% Negative increase 7.8
31 31  South Carolina 12.1% Negative increase 9.5
32 32  Georgia 11.9% Negative increase 7.7
33 33  Idaho 11.5% Negative increase 8.9
34  American Samoa 11.4%[5]
35 34  Colorado 11.3% Negative increase 6.8
35 34  Montana 11.3% Negative increase 7.8
35 34  New Mexico 11.3% Negative increase 5.4
38 37  Kansas 11.2% Negative increase 8.1
 Northern Mariana Islands[6] 11.2%
39  District of Columbia 11.1% Negative increase 5.1
40 38  Maine 10.6% Negative increase 7.4
40 38  Virginia 10.6% Negative increase 7.3
42 40  Arkansas 10.2% Negative increase 5.4
42 40  Iowa 10.2% Negative increase 6.5
42 40  South Dakota 10.2% Negative increase 6.9
45 43  Maryland 9.9% Negative increase 6.6
46 44  Missouri 9.7% Negative increase 5.2
46 44  Utah 9.7% Negative increase 6.1
48 46  Wyoming 9.2% Negative increase 5.5
49  Puerto Rico[7] 8.8% Positive decrease 0.1
50 47  North Dakota 8.5% Negative increase 6.3
51 48  Nebraska 8.3% Negative increase 4.1
52 49  Minnesota 8.1% Negative increase 5
53 50  Connecticut 7.9% Negative increase 4.2
54  Virgin Islands[8] 5.2% Positive decrease 0.1
55  Guam[9] 3.6% Positive decrease 1.0

See also

References

  1. ^ "Geographic Profile of Employment and Unemployment Home Page". BLS. Retrieved 2010-12-12.
  2. ^ "Unemployment rates - Unemployment rates by State". CNNMoney. 2008-12-19. Retrieved 2010-12-12.
  3. ^ Kimberly Hughes (2007-10-31). "What is the difference between seasonally adjusted and non-seasonally adjusted data?" (PDF). Nebraska Department of Labor. Retrieved 2010-12-12.[permanent dead link]
  4. ^ "Current Unemployment Rates for States and Historical Highs/Lows". Bureau of Labor Statistics. May 2020. Retrieved 2015-12-18.
  5. ^ https://www.samoanews.com/local-news/lolo-administration-confident-future-strength-our-economy Samoanews.com. Lolo Administration is confident "in the future strength of our economy". Fili Sagapolutele. January 15, 2020. Retrieved July 2, 2020.
  6. ^ https://www.gao.gov/assets/670/662127.pdf
    GAO - American Samoa and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands - Economic Indicators Since Minimum Wage Increases Began. March 2014. [American Samoa data: page 103 (page 109 of PDF); Northern Mariana Islands data: page 60 (page 66 of PDF)]. Retrieved October 7, 2018.
  7. ^ "Economy at a Glance — Puerto Rico". Bureau of Labor Statistics. January 2020. Retrieved January 29, 2020.
  8. ^ "Virgin Islands Local Area Unemployment Rates". Virgin Islands Department of Labor. December 2020. Retrieved January 29, 2020.
  9. ^ http://bls.guam.gov/unemployment-situation-on-guam/
    http://bls.guam.gov/wp-content/uploads/bsk-pdf-manager/2020/03/Unemp_Guam_September-2019.pdf
    Unemployment Situation on Guam. Bureau of Labor Statistics. September 2019. Retrieved January 29, 2020.

External links

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