Magic City (club)

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Coordinates: 33°44′53.9″N 84°23′50.3″W / 33.748306°N 84.397306°W / 33.748306; -84.397306

Magic City
Strip club
Founded1985 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States
FounderMichael “Magic” Barney [1]
Headquarters,
Key people

Michael “Magic” Barney"[2]
OwnerMichael “Magic” Barney
Number of employees
150 dancers and 20+ other[3] (2010)
Websitemagiccity.com

Magic City is a prominent strip club in Atlanta, founded in 1985[4] and currently owned by Michael “Magic” Barney [1][2]

Hip hop and rap ties

Described by Dan Gartland of Sports Illustrated as a "legendary strip club that should be familiar to anyone who knows anything about rap music",[5] Magic City has well-documented ties with the trap and hip hop scene. It was partially responsible for launching the careers of Future[2][6] and Migos.[6] DJ Esco worked at Magic City.[7] Magic City has hosted performances with Young Thug, Future and 2 Chainz.[8] DC the Brain Supreme of Tag Team worked at Magic City when he released the hit "Whoomp! (There It Is)".[9]

In popular culture

Various songs pay homage to Magic City, including "Magic City Monday" by Jeezy[10] and "Magic" by Future.[11] The former mentions "Monday", because Magic City is "supposedly the Holy Grail of Atlanta strip clubs on Monday nights".[12] In July 2015, GQ released a documentary Magic City about the strip club, directed by Lauren Greenfield.[13] Late 2018, Drake collaborated with Magic City to create the "Scorpion City" merchandise collection.[8]

Notable visitors and events

In addition to the artists mentioned in the § Hip hop and rap ties section, Magic City has been visited by 2Pac and Biggie,[2] and Michael Jordan.[9] In November 2018, Magic City was temporarily refashioned as "Future City" to celebrate Future's thirty-fifth birthday, and was visited by him, Drake, Lil Yachty, Jacquees, Pastor Troy, and others.[14] Drake allegedly had an armored truck deliver $100,000 in cash to the strip club.[14] In December 2018, Atlanta United FC players celebrated their MLS Cup victory at Magic City.[5]

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, NBA Player Lou Williams admitted to visiting the club during an excused absence from the NBA Bubble.[15] Williams originally left the bubble to attend his grandfather's funeral[16] but said he visited the club because it "is my favorite restaurant in the world."[17]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Friedman, Devin (July 8, 2015). "Inside Magic City, the Atlanta Strip Club that Runs the Music Industry". GQ. Condé Nast. Retrieved December 26, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d "In Da Club". de Volkskrant (in Dutch). September 23, 2017. Retrieved December 26, 2018.
  3. ^ Joyner, Tammy (February 8, 2010). "Hard times push more women to strip clubs". AJC. Retrieved December 26, 2018.
  4. ^ https://www.gq.com/story/atlanta-strip-club-magic-city
  5. ^ a b Gartland, Dan (December 11, 2018). "Atlanta United: Magic City celebration with MLS Cup". Sports Illustrated. Danny Lee. Retrieved December 26, 2018.
  6. ^ a b Dart, Chris (November 16, 2015). "Inside the Atlanta strip club that supposedly runs the music industry". The A.V. Club. Retrieved December 26, 2018.
  7. ^ Lee, Christina (March 13, 2018). ""Atlanta" Is the Only TV Show That's Honest About Strip Clubs". The Village Voice. Retrieved December 26, 2018.
  8. ^ a b Minton, Melissa (November 21, 2018). "Drake's new merch inspired by strip clubs". Page Six. Jesse Angelo. Retrieved December 26, 2018.
  9. ^ a b Lee, Christina (June 22, 2016). "How a Strip Club DJ's Death Marked the End of an Era in Atlanta Hip-Hop". Pitchfork. Retrieved December 26, 2018.
  10. ^ Legaspi, Althea (June 24, 2016). "Jeezy, 2 Chainz, Future Head to Strip Club for 'Magic City Monday'". Rolling Stone. Retrieved December 26, 2018.
  11. ^ Caramanica, Jon (September 5, 2012). "Business and Pleasure". The New York Times. A. G. Sulzberger. Retrieved December 26, 2018.
  12. ^ Blair, Elizabeth (December 23, 2010). "Strip Clubs: Launch Pads For Hits In Atlanta". NPR. Retrieved December 26, 2018.
  13. ^ "Magic City". GQ. July 3, 2015. Retrieved December 26, 2018.
  14. ^ a b Colburn, Randall (November 21, 2018). "Drake had an armored truck deliver $100,000 in cash to Atlanta strip club". Consequence of Sound. Retrieved December 26, 2018.
  15. ^ Shelburne, Ramona; Marks, Bobby. "Sources: Clippers' Lou Williams investigated by NBA about actions while on leave". ESPN. Retrieved July 25, 2020.
  16. ^ Baer, Jack. "Reports: NBA investigating Lou Williams' trip to strip club while outside bubble". Yahoo Sports. Retrieved July 25, 2020.
  17. ^ Vardon, Sam Amick, Shams Charania, Joe. "Sources reveal details of Lou Williams' strip club dinner..." The Athletic. Retrieved July 26, 2020.

External links

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