Portal:United States

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Introduction

Flag of the United States of America
Great Seal of the United States of America
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The United States of America is a federal republic of 50 states, a capital district, and a few other territories. It resides mostly in central North America. The U.S. has three land borders, two with Canada and one with Mexico, and is otherwise bounded by the Pacific Ocean, the Bering Sea, the Arctic Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean. Of the 50 states, only Alaska and Hawaii are not contiguous with any other state. The U.S. also has a collection of districts, territories, and possessions around the world. Each state has a high level of local autonomy according to the system of federalism. The United States traces its national origin to the declaration by 13 British colonies in 1776 that they were free and independent states. They were recognized as such by the Treaty of Paris in 1783. Since then, the nation has grown to become a global superpower and exerts a high level of economic, political, military, and cultural influence.
Libertybell alone small.jpg More about… the United States, its history and diversity

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Map of Plymouth Colony showing town locations
Plymouth Colony was an English colonial venture in North America from 1620 until 1691. The first settlement was at New Plymouth, a location previously surveyed and named by Captain John Smith. The settlement, which served as the capital of the colony, is today the modern town of Plymouth, Massachusetts. At its height, Plymouth Colony occupied most of the southeastern portion of the modern state of Massachusetts.

Founded by a group of separatists who later came to be known as the Pilgrims, Plymouth Colony was, along with Jamestown, Virginia, one of the earliest colonies to be founded by the English in North America and the first sizable permanent English settlement in the New England region. Aided by Squanto, a Native American, the colony was able to establish a treaty with Chief Massasoit which helped to ensure the colony's success. The colony played a central role in King Philip's War, one of the earliest and bloodiest of the Indian Wars. Ultimately, the colony was annexed by the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1691.

Plymouth holds a special role in American history. Rather than being entrepreneurs like many of the settlers of Jamestown, the citizens of Plymouth were fleeing religious persecution and searching for a place to worship God as they saw fit. The social and legal systems of the colony were thus closely tied to their religious beliefs. Many of the people and events surrounding Plymouth Colony have become part of American mythology, including the North American tradition known as Thanksgiving and the monument known as Plymouth Rock. Despite the colony's relatively short history, it has become an important symbol of what is now labeled "American", owing largely to its treatment in American public schools.

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A brown bird with speckled eyes sits on the grass.


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Smedley Butler
Smedley Darlington Butler (July 30, 1881 – June 21, 1940), nicknamed "The Fighting Quaker" and "Old Gimlet Eye", was a Major General in the U.S. Marine Corps, and at the time of his death the most decorated Marine in U.S. history. During his 34-year career as a Marine, he participated in military actions in the Philippines, China, in Central America and the Caribbean during the Banana Wars, and France in World War I. By the end of his career he had received 16 medals, five of which were for heroism. He is one of 19 people to twice receive the Medal of Honor, one of three to be awarded both the Marine Corps Brevet Medal and the Medal of Honor, and the only person to be awarded the Brevet Medal and two Medals of Honor, all for separate actions.

Butler continued his speaking engagements in an extended tour but in June 1940 checked himself into a naval hospital, dying a few weeks later from what was believed to be cancer. He was buried at Oaklands Cemetery in West Chester, Pennsylvania; his home has been maintained as a memorial and contains memorabilia collected during his various careers.

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Franklin D. Roosevelt
This great Nation will endure as it has endured, will revive and will prosper. So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself.

Anniversaries for October 18

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A traditional soul food dinner consisting of fried chicken with macaroni and cheese, collard greens, and fried okra

Soul food is a variety of cuisine originating in the Southeastern United States, and from African American culture. It has both European and Native American influences. It is common in areas with a historical presence of African Americans and has been a cultural staple among the African American and American Deep-South communities for centuries. The expression "soul food" originated in the mid-1960s, when "soul" was a common word used to describe African American culture. Read more...

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George WytheWilliam WhippleJosiah BartlettThomas Lynch Jr.Benjamin HarrisonRichard Henry LeeSamuel AdamsGeorge ClintonWilliam PacaSamuel ChaseLewis MorrisWilliam FloydArthur MiddletonThomas Heyward Jr.Charles CarrollGeorge WaltonRobert MorrisThomas WillingBenjamin RushElbridge GerryRobert Treat PaineAbraham ClarkStephen HopkinsWilliam ElleryGeorge ClymerWilliam HooperJoseph HewesJames WilsonFrancis HopkinsonJohn AdamsRoger ShermanRobert LivingstonThomas JeffersonBenjamin FranklinRichard StocktonFrancis LewisJohn WitherspoonSamuel HuntingtonWilliam WilliamsOliver WolcottCharles ThomsonJohn HancockGeorge ReadJohn DickinsonEdward RutledgeThomas McKeanPhilip LivingstonDeclaration of Independence (1819), by John Trumbull.jpg
Trumbull's Declaration of Independence
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Credit: John Trumbull

John Trumbull's Declaration of Independence is a 12-by-18-foot oil-on-canvas painting in the United States Capitol Rotunda that depicts the presentation of the draft of the Declaration of Independence to Congress.

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Houston Skyline
Houston is the fourth-largest city in the United States of America and the largest city within the state of Texas. As of the 2006 U.S. Census estimate, the city has a population of 2.14 million. Houston is the economic center of the Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown metropolitan area—the sixth-largest metropolitan area in the U.S. with a population of more than 5.5 million.

The city was incorporated on June 5, 1837 and named after then-President of the Republic of Texas—former General Sam Houston. The burgeoning port and railroad industry, combined with oil discovery in 1901, has induced continual surges in the city's population. In the mid-twentieth century, Houston became the home of the Texas Medical Center and NASA's Johnson Space Center, where Mission Control Center is located.

Houston's economy has a broad industrial base in the energy, manufacturing, aeronautics, and technology; only New York City is home to more Fortune 500 headquarters. The Port of Houston ranks first in the United States in international waterborne tonnage handled. It is home to many cultural institutions and exhibits—attracting more than 7 million visitors a year to the Houston Museum District. Houston has an active visual and performing arts scene in the Theater District and is one of five U.S. cities that offer year-round resident companies in all major performing arts.

Selected culture biography

Zappa performing in Ekeberghallen, Oslo, on January 16, 1977
Frank Vincent Zappa (/ˈzæpə/; December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, singer-songwriter, electric guitarist, record producer, and film director. In a career spanning more than 30 years, Zappa wrote rock, jazz, electronic, orchestral, and musique concrète works. He also directed feature-length films and music videos, and designed album covers. Zappa produced almost all of the more than 60 albums he released with the band The Mothers of Invention and as a solo artist.

Zappa was married to Kathryn J. "Kay" Sherman from 1960 to 1964. In 1967, he married Adelaide Gail Sloatman, with whom he remained until his death from prostate cancer in 1993. They had four children: Moon Unit, Dweezil, Ahmet Emuukha Rodan and Diva Thin Muffin Pigeen. Gail Zappa manages the businesses of her late husband under the name the Zappa Family Trust.

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Wikinews United States portal
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As of 18 October 2019, there are 1,216 featured and 3,182 good articles within WikiProject United States scope. This makes up 5.46% of the articles on Gpedia, 13.33% of all featured articles and lists, and 10.52% of all good articles. Including non-article pages, such as talk pages, redirects, categories, etcetera, there are 1,036,994 pages in the project.
Featured culture biographies: Actors and filmmakersJames Thomas Aubrey, Jr.Kroger BabbEric BanaJoseph BarberaBette DavisKirsten DunstJudy GarlandJake GyllenhaalMaggie GyllenhaalAnthony Michael HallWilliam HannaPhil HartmanEthan HawkeKatie HolmesJanet JacksonMichael JacksonAngelina JolieDiane KeatonMadonna (entertainer)Austin NicholsBrad PittNancy ReaganRonald ReaganAaron SorkinKaDee StricklandSharon TateReese WitherspoonAnna May Wong; Arts and entertainmentJames Robert BakerWilliam D. BoyceStephen CraneH.D.Emily DickinsonGeorge Washington DixonZelda FitzgeraldMargaret FullerWilliam GibsonRufus Wilmot GriswoldErnest HemingwayOliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.Jenna JamesonJames Russell LowellMaster JubaI. M. PeiEdgar Allan PoeRoman VishniacNathaniel Parker Willis; MusiciansAaliyahAlice in ChainsAudioslaveBix BeiderbeckeBig StarMariah CareyDamageplanBob DylanFlea (musician)Black FrancisJohn FruscianteGodsmackThe GreencardsInsane Clown PosseJanet JacksonMichael JacksonBradley JosephMaynard James KeenanFrank KlepackiDavid LoveringMadonna (entertainer)John MayerMetallicaNine Inch NailsNirvana (band)The Notorious B.I.G.Leo OrnsteinEllis PaulPearl JamPixiesElvis PresleySelenaSlayerThe Smashing PumpkinsElliott SmithGwen StefaniThe SupremesTool (band)Uncle TupeloWilcoFrank Zappa; Sports and gamesNick AdenhartShelton BenjaminMoe BergTim DuncanBobby EatonOrval GroveArt HouttemanMagic JohnsonMichael JordanBart KingSandy KoufaxJimmy McAleerBob MeuselStan MusialBen PaschalCM PunkJ. R. RichardJackie RobinsonBill RussellSigi SchmidLee Smith (baseball)Ozzie SmithPaul StastnyJim ThorpeTyrone Wheatley

Featured society biographies: MilitaryDaniel BooneJames BowieSimon Bolivar BucknerHenry Cornelius BurnettFrederick Russell BurnhamWesley ClarkBrian EatonGerald FordWinfield Scott HancockBenjamin HarrisonWilliam Henry HarrisonRutherford B. HayesThomas C. HindmanThomas C. KinkaidEli LillyJohn McCainGeorge B. McClellanFred MoosallySylvanus MorleyEdwin Taylor PollockRonald ReaganUriel SebreeLawrence Sullivan RossIsaac ShelbyWilliam Tecumseh ShermanMyles StandishEdward TellerBenjamin Franklin TilleyStephen TriggHarriet Tubman; Politics and governmentSamuel AdamsJ. C. W. BeckhamDaniel BooneWilliam O'Connell BradleySimon Bolivar BucknerHenry Cornelius BurnettCharles Carroll the SettlerMurray ChotinerWesley ClarkGrover ClevelandCalvin CoolidgeRichard CordrayJohn J. CrittendenGerald FordWendell FordWilliam GoebelEmma GoldmanJohn W. JohnstonFranklin Knight LaneJohn McCainGeorge B. McClellanBob McEwenThomas R. MarshallHarvey MilkEdwin P. MorrowPat NixonBarack ObamaRosa ParksPaul E. PattonEdwin Taylor PollockNancy ReaganRonald ReaganTheodore RooseveltLawrence Sullivan RossTerry SanfordAntonin ScaliaSolomon P. SharpIsaac ShelbyAugustus Owsley StanleyStephen TriggJerry VoorhisDaniel WebsterFranklin D. RooseveltHarry S. Truman; Science and academiaEdward Drinker CopeOliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.David A. JohnstonEli LillyGlynn LunneyBarbara McClintockSylvanus MorleyGerard K. O'NeillHilary PutnamEdward TellerRoman VishniacOtto Julius Zobel

Featured lists: There are over 230 Featured lists in the scope of United States including: 109th United States CongressCommandant of the Marine CorpsKorean War Medal of Honor recipientsMost populous counties in the United StatesNational Parks of the United StatesTallest buildings in Washington, D.C.U.S. state name etymologiesU.S. states by populationUnited States Secretary of EnergyVolcanoes in the Hawaiian – Emperor seamount chain
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History (book A, B) TimelinePre-ColumbianColonial United StatesThirteen ColoniesDeclaration of IndependenceAmerican RevolutionWestward ExpansionCivil WarReconstruction EraWorld War IGreat DepressionWorld War IIKorean WarCold WarVietnam WarCivil Rights MovementWar on TerrorismForeign relationsMilitaryDemographicIndustrialInventions and DiscoveriesPostal

Government (book) Law (ConstitutionBill of RightsSeparation of powers) • Legislative branch (HouseSenate) • Executive Branch (CabinetFederal agencies) • Judicial Branch (Supreme CourtAppeals) • Law enforcement (DoJFBI) • Intelligence (CIADIANSA) • Military (ArmyNavyMarinesAir ForceCoast Guard) • Flag

Politics (outline) Political parties (DemocratsRepublicans) • Elections (Electoral College) • Political ideologyPolitical scandalsRed states and blue statesUncle SamPuerto Rican independence movement

Geography (book) Political divisionsTerritoryStatesCitiesCountiesRegions (New EnglandMid-AtlanticThe SouthMidwestGreat PlainsNorthwestSouthwest) • Mountains (AppalachianRocky) • Rivers (MississippiColorado) • IslandsExtreme pointsNational Park SystemWater supply and sanitation

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Economy (book) U.S. Dollar • Companies • Wall StreetFederal ReserveBankingStandard of living (Personal & Household incomeIncome inequalityHomeownership) • CommunicationsTransportation (CarsTrucksHighwaysAirportsRailroads) • Tourism

Society Demographics (book A, B) • Languages (American EnglishSpanish) • ReligionSocial class (American DreamAffluenceMiddle classPovertyEducational attainmentProfessional and working class conflict) • MediaEducationHolidaysCrimePrisonsHealth care

Culture (book) Music (ClassicalFolkPopularJazz) • Film & TV (Hollywood) • Literature (American FolklorePoetryTranscendentalismHarlem RenaissanceBeat generation) • PhilosophyVisual arts • (Abstract expressionism) • CuisineDanceArchitectureFashion

Issues Affirmative actionAmerican exceptionalismAnti-AmericanismCapital punishmentDrug policy & ProhibitionEnvironmentalismHuman rightsImmigrationMexico–United States barrierObesityPornographyRacial profilingSame-sex marriageAbortionAdolescent sexuality

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