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User Page: photographer & art historian.


Assault of March 2021

Peter's torso in June 2009
Upper part of the statue put up in honour the benevolevent and popular old Etonian Valtelline governor-general/landamann Pietro, PETRI.S.R.I.COM.A.SALIS..., in 1782/83.
Full heraldic achievement as seen in 2009
The full heraldic achievement (arms) of Peter, as seen on the plinth of his statue in Chiavenna

Peter de Salis, 3rd Count de Salis (Nobile Signor Don Pietro Podesta di Salis) (28 June 1738, parish of St. James, Westminster - 19 November 1807, Hillingdon, buried in the family vault at Harlington, Middlesex) was a Count de Salis-Soglio. He was the second son of Jerome De Salis by his wife Mary, daughter of the first Viscount Fane. He was educated with his brothers, Charles and Henry, in the Grisons, in Chur where his tutor was Johann Heinrich Lambert, and then at Eton. He left Eton early in 1754 and was commissioned as an ensign in the 1st Regiment of Foot on 17 October 1754, which cost £900, subsequently he fought in the Seven Years' War, becoming a lieutenant on 27 October 1760. He left the army a captain and was sent by his father to the Grisons where he married a second cousin in 1763, she died, morte avec une fille en couches a year later. In 1765 he married a first cousin, she died 18 months later. In 1769 he married a combined third and fourth cousin, she bore him two sons and outlived him 22 years.

The plinth of Peter's statue
Base of the statue.
Chiavenna: site of the statue of Salis

Character

His brother Charles in a letter to their mother, dated London, 16 April 1766, described something of Peter's mind:

Peter writes to me his usual style, a perfect miniature of the lamentations of Jeremiah,
The letter Par Lindau & par Coire, au païs des Grisons à Chiavenne'’, was Recu in Leiden ce 22 ayr: 1766 a six heures et demi du matin, and was Received le 9e. May 1766 in Chiavenna.

Landeshauptmann

Salis was Governor and Capitaine General of the Valtelline 1771–1773, and 1781–1783, where, it was said at the time, with great munificence, insight and skill he hastened to relieve the poverty of the population of Chiavenna. Accordingly, in 1782 a statue was put up to him in a main square there. However, the statue was dismembered in 1797. Fragments survive.

Anglo-Irish property

Schedule of rental of the estates of JOHN Earl of SANDWICH and PETER DE SALIS, in the Manor of Clare in County of Armagh, 1802.

In March 1785 he inherited his mother's half share of the Bourchier-Fane estates in counties Limerick and Armagh, (Ireland). On 13 November 1785 he returned to England, landing with his family at Dover. From then he styled himself Esquire and lived mostly at 19 Orchard Street, near Portman Square; 11 Great Cumberland Street; in Hayes; and then at Hillingdon Park, Hillingdon-heath, near Uxbridge, a fine villa which Joseph Bonomi designed for him c. 1795–1797.

The Hon. Peter de Salis, Count of the Holy Roman Empire, died 19 November 1809 at his house on Hillingdon-Heath. (from The Times, 26 November 1809)

He was succeeded in his British estates by his elder son, Jerome and his younger son John/Johann/Giovanni seems to have inherited his Grisons property.

Some Ancestors

Silver gilt mourning ring for PETER DE SALIS ESQ DIED 19 NOV:1807 AGED.69.
Some of Peter De Salis's ancestors
Peter De Salis (1738–1809) Father:
Jerome, Count De Salis
Paternal Grandfather:
Peter, Count de Salis-Soglio
Paternal Great-Grandfather:
Antonio de Salis-Soglio
Paternal Great-grandmother:
Perpetua v. Planta-Zuoz
Paternal Grandmother:
Margherita v. Salis-Soglio (casa di Mezzo)
Paternal Great-Grandfather:
Hercules v. Salis-Soglio
Paternal Great-Grandmother:
Maria Magdalena v. Salis-Seewis
Mother:
Hon. Mary Fane
Maternal Grandfather:
Viscount Fane
Maternal Great-Grandfather:
Sir Henry Fane, KB
Maternal Great-Grandmother:
Elizabeth Southcott
Maternal Grandmother:
Mary Stanhope
Maternal Great-grandfather:
Hon. Alexander Stanhope
Maternal Great-Grandmother:
Catherine Burghill

His eldest brother Charles

Charles de Salis, unsuccessful Parliamentary candidate for Reading, 1761.

He was born on 25 July 1736 in the Parish of St. James, Westminster and died without children at Hieres, Provence, July 1781, aged 45.

He was the eldest son of Anglo-Grison diplomat Jerome, Count de Salis-Soglio, who had been Naturalized a British Subject in 1731, by his wife Mary, eldest daughter of Charles Fane, 1st Viscount Fane.

After some schooling with his younger brothers (Peter, Rev Dr. Henry, and William) in his father's ancestral homeland (the Grisons Republic), he studied at Eton from 1747 to 1753,[1] where he was one of the 250 pupils there at the time. He traveled abroad from 1757 to 1760; the tour covered Lausanne (university), Northern Italy, Rome, Naples, Coire, Paris, Turin, and Holland.[2]

His maternal uncle, an Irish peer, Charles, 2nd Viscount Fane (an Opposition/Bedford Whig), was one of the two Members of Parliament (MPs) for Reading from 1754 to 1761.

In 1761, De Salis stood in his namesake and uncle's place as one of the two MPs for Reading, but having been admitted to a Freeman/Burgess of the Corporation of Reading on 4 March 1761 he was well beaten at the poll on 25 March 1761. De Salis only obtained 258 votes, whereas the elected candidates polled 396 (John Dodd) and 355 (Sir Francis Knollys).[3]

After this defeat De Salis retired to southern France but returned on his uncle's death in 1766. He wrote to his mother about his uncle Charles Fane (c1707-1766) on 16 April 1766: I am afraid ... all the personal and real estates [in county Armagh; county Limerick; Devon; and Lower Basildon in Berkshire] subject to the payment of Lord Fane’s debts do not amount to much more than the lists of debts we have got in.[4]

Dr. Pierre Pomme, who knew and treated Charles de Salis and his mother.

After returning to Provence having executed his uncle's will in 1766, he continued to live at Arles, Salon, Nîmes and Hieres (also spelled: Hyères), where he died and was buried at the Couvent (Convent) des Cordeliers (now the Église Saint-Louis d'Hyères) in 1781.

On 6 April 1764 Charles' contemporary, Edward Gibbon, wrote in his diary whilst in Lausanne: De Salis d'une indifférence qui vient plus d'un défaut de sensibilité que d'un excès de raison (this translates as: De Salis [has] an indifference that comes more from a lack of sensitivity due to excess [of grape].).[5]

He seems to have shared with his mother, maternal-grandmother (Mary Stanhope), and to a greater degree, his maternal-aunt a predilection for the vapours. De Salis and his mother both received treatment in Provence to cure their own low-spirits from the renowned vapour theorist, Monsieur Pierre Pomme (Arles, 1735 - Marseille 1812) who practiced in Arles from 1751 to 1766.[6][7][citation needed]

References

  1. ^ Eton College Register, 1753-1790, R. A. Austen-Leigh, 1921, page 157.
  2. ^ Fane de Salis MSS
  3. ^ History of Parliament, 1754-1790, 1964.
  4. ^ The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1754-1790, ed. L. Namier, J. Brooke., 1964.
  5. ^ Quoted from The Life of Edward Gibbon, by Rev. H. H. Milman, Paris, 1840, page 125. It is possible that Gibbon is referring to Charles' brother Peter, though as according to Horace Walpole (Walpole to John Chute, Paris, 30 August 1769 re a Pomme treatment on (the 17th) Lord Dacre, who was 'prescribed wine') Pomme recommended wine as a cure for the vapours it is most likely that this was Charles.
  6. ^ See Monsieur Pomme's Traité des affections vaporeuses des deux sexes, ou maladies nerveuses, vulgairement appelées maux de nerfs, Lyons, 1764, etc. Not a valid source but the German Wikipedia has a respectable article on Dr. Pierre Pomme.
  7. ^ Jean Monteil, 'Un manuscrit inachevé de Grasset' : Pierre Pomme et les maladies nerveuses au XVIIIe siècle. 'Manuscrit signalé dans la Revue Histoire des sciences médicales', 11, 2, 1977, pp. 60-62.
18th-century Salis crest, Bellona, and count's coronet on an Irish silver jug
Peter's distant cousin, third wife, and mother of his two surviving sons Jerome and John
Paternal-grandmother-in-law: Anna à Salis-Samedan (d.1738).
Peter De Salis, wearing the waistcoat made for him by his Huguenot sister-in-law, Julia Blosset.
  • R. de Salis, Quadrennial di Fano Saliceorum, volume one, London, 2003
  • Rachel Fane De Salis, De Salis Family : English Branch, Henley-on-Thames, 1934.
  • manuscripts & muniments.
  • The Times, notice of death, 26 November 1807, (page 3, column F).
Regnal titles
Preceded by Count de Salis-Soglio
1794–1807
Succeeded by


Category:1738 births Category:1807 deaths Category:18th-century Irish landowners Category:19th-century Irish landowners Category:Royal Scots officers Category:People educated at Eton College Category:British people of Swiss descent Category:Swiss-Italian people Peter de Salis-Soglio Category:People from Hillingdon Category:People from Marylebone Category:Counts de Salis-Soglio and Comtes de Salis-Seewis Peter

{EngvarB|date=July 2017}}

Thomas-Chaloner Bisse-Challoner
Colonel Thomas-Chaloner Bisse-Challoner (c 1860) by Spiridone Giambardella.jpg
Born(1788-12-11)11 December 1788
Died26 July 1872(1872-07-26) (aged 83)
NationalityBritish
OccupationMilitia Colonel and Magistrate

Thomas-Chaloner Bisse-Challoner[Note 1] DL, JP (1788–1872) was a British militia colonel who enlarged the former country house and landscape garden in 600 acres (2.4 km2) at Portnall Park, Virginia Water, then considered Egham Heath, sitting on the Bagshot Formation.[1] This laid the foundation for the Wentworth Estate and many of the opulent houses of the sparesly populated area, alongside its proximity to Windsor and Windsor Great Park as the British royal family's wealth and connections expanded enabling them to set up nearby grand homes. He inherited much of his fortune principally via his great-aunt Lydia Challoner and cousin Valentina Aynscombe.

Ancestry, early life, education and family life

Colonel Challoner was the only son of the Rev. Thomas Bisse (c.1754-d.13 November 1828), of Portnall Park, Virginia Water and Katherine Townsend (d.1815/16) daughter of Anne Smith, a daughter of merchant Robert Smith, of London and Mortlake.

He was educated at Eton College (c1802-1805) and Trinity College, Oxford.[Note 2]

Father

His father, the Rev. Thomas Bisse, armigerous according to Oxford, attended Wadham College from 1 July 1772,[2] aged 18, and been awarded a BA, 19 April 1776, Battels Christmas 1783, and MA, 22 May 1783. Appointed curate at Kingswear, Exeter in 1784. Rev. Thomas Bisse was the son Thomas Bisse of London (Thomae Bisse de Civ. Londin:), (‘’a gent.’’, again according to Oxford University), possibly the Rev. Thomas Bisse, A.M., chaplain of New College (and All Souls) 1729 and 1732, a nephew or son of the Rev. Dr. Thomas Bisse (1675–1731) preacher at the Rolls Chapel, London, author of The Beauties of Holiness, 1716 and prebend then chancellor of Hereford, and hence was also nephew or son of Philip Bisse, FRS (elected 13 June 1706), Bishop of Hereford.

However, his father is more likely to have been Thomas Bisse (d.1766) Drawing master of Christ's Hospital from 1754 to 1766, successor to Alexander Cozens, who mentions a son Thomas, a brother William, niece Joan, and late wife Susanna in his will.[3][failed verification] (Bernard Lens II was also a Christ's Hospital Drawing Master).

Dr. and Bishop Bisse were sons of Rev. John Bisse, Rector of Oldbury from 1659/60, co. Gloucester (c1638-d.1686, buried 19 July), who had matriculated Wadham College 28 March 1655. He was son of Thomas Bisse of Lullington, Somerset, and grandson of Thomas Bisse, and great-grandson of Dr. Phillip Bisse (c.1540 – October 1613) who had been Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford 1561–65, Archdeacon of Taunton, a benefactor of All Souls and had made the inaugural gift of 2,000 books to Wadham College Library. Their mother, Joyce Giles, died 8 September 1717, aged 80 (Historical Register Chronicle 1714–1738), via Musgrave).

A cousin, Philip Bisse (c.1611–1642, killed by Irish), a grandson of Dr. Philip Bisse, the Wadham benefactor, was Archdeacon of Cloyne, and possibly he for whom the Bisse arms were registered in Ireland, 25 May 1637.

Half-brother

William Chaloner Bisse (1822–1849) was the Rev. Thomas Bisse's son by his second wife, Charlotte, whom he married in 1818, a daughter of Charles Price of Knightsbridge. His aunt Elizabeth Price married 24 June 1799 Jonathan Raine (1763–1831), of Lincoln's Inn and 33 Bedford Row, KC, a Yorkshire born, sometime MP for various Cornish constituencies, and eventually a Welsh judge. Charlotte was left £1,000 per annum, as fixed by my marriage settlement when Thomas Bisse died in 1828. At the same time William was left five shares in the Stafford and Worcester Canal.

He became an Ensign in the 73rd Regiment of Foot on 12 March 1841; was promoted to Lieutenant on 5 April 1844; and to Captain on 12 May 1848. However, he died in Ireland on 8 June 1849 aged 27 and lies buried at Templemore in Tipperary, where his 'brother officers' erected a marble tablet in the chancel of the New Church.

Family tree

Six generation ancestral table connecting families of Aynscombe, Smith, Challoner, Wight, Townsend, Bisse, de Salis, inter alia.

Challoner's maternal great–grandfather Robert Smith (c. 1672–1748), a freeman of London, of Thames Street, London and Mortlake, was the common ancestor.

Smith had ten children:

  • Alice who married Mr. Owirk.
  • Ann(e) who married John Townsend, had:
    • William of Fulham House (1741–1823)[4][5]
    • Mary Barnard, d. Little Chelsea (16 April 1842, aged 90), widow of Prebend of Peterborough)
    • Katherine Bisse (died 1816), had:
      • Thomas-Chaloner Bisse(-Chaloner)
  • Lydia (1714–1803), married Thomas Waters (died 1738), then George Challoner (died 1770) of Hales Hall,[6] Cheadle, Staffordshire. Later she was of Tite Hill, Egham.[7]
  • Elizabeth who married Joseph Pouschon;
  • Lillie Aynscombe (c. 1715 – 1791, buried Clewer, Berkshire) – by Private Act of Parliament of 1747 he changed his surname.[8] He was a director of the Sun Fire Office from, at latest, 1754 until his death in 1791. He married Valentina Aynscombe (died 1771, buried Clewer) most direct descendant and beneficiary of Thomas Aynscombe (died 1740) of Charterhouse Square. Her father Philip Aynscombe (died Boulogne 1737) had married Valentina (died 1745), of St. George, Hanover Square, daughter and heir of Daniel Wight III of Southwark.
  • Sarah;
  • Catherine (Miss Kitty Smith) (died Brompton 1807), married 31 March 1758, Rev. William Fraigneau (1717–1778). Fraigneau was fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, tutor to family of Frederick, Lord Bolingbroke and Rector of Beckenham (1765–1778), Kent and Vicar of Battersea (1758–1778). Cambridge's Regius Professor of Greek 1744–1750;
  • Phoebe (died Fulham, 29 March 1821)[9] married Mr. Richard McPhedris/Macphradris/Macpheadris. She was a subscriber to the first edition of Ann Yearsley's Poems on Several Occasions, 1785, and was listed (with her niece and visitant Mrs Porter), as a £1 subscriber to the Gentleman's Magazine (May 1813);
  • Jane (1720 – 17 July 1793, aged 73), married, 1751, Rev. Dr. Henry Stebbing, FRS, FSA, (died 1788), son of the divine Rev. Henry Stebbing (1687–1763), and had two children: Henry (barrister) of Brompton Row, and Anne Duval. Henry Stebbing III (1752–1817) produced Sermons on Practical Subjects (1788), by the late Reverend Henry Stebbing, D.D., preacher to the Hon. Society of Gray's Inn; and
  • William (who was left £4,000 and Mortlake property)[Note 3]

Robert Smith had given Lillie £10,000 on marriage and half his trade and 50 shares in the Sun Fire Office.[10] When Lillie died in 1791 The Scots Magazine, (vol. 53, p. 102), reported :

10. At his seat at Mortlake, Lillie Ainscombe, Esq; one of the directors of the Sun Fire assurance–office. He has left seven sisters, whose ages, computed with his own, some little time before his death, made 572 years.

Lillie left three daughters (who died without surviving issue (sine prole)):

  • Valentina Aynscombe (c. 1749 – 23 March 1841 (G.M. 556), aged 92) – Col. Challoner inherited various properties and pictures from her.
  • Mary Aynscombe (died 1828) married the Rev. John Mossop (1774–1849), vicar of Hothfield, Kent 1802–1849.
  • Charlotte Anne Aynscombe, (1760, Clewer, Berkshire – 1799, Mortlake, Surrey).

Inherited wealth

Challoner inherited stocks, homes, and residues from: his maternal-great aunt (including ten shares in Trent Navigation) Lydia Challoner of Egham (died 1803), via his father (died 1828), by which time they were referred to as: the twenty canal shares now recently made forty; from his aunt Mary Barnard of Fulham (and Dorset?) (died 1842); and from his mother's first cousin Valentina Aynscombe of Mortlake (died 1841).

Change of name

In 1829, the authorities permitted him to extend his surname: The London Gazette announced this: Whitehall, 22 January 1829.[11]

The King has been pleased to give and grant unto Thomas Challoner Bisse of Portnall-park, in the parish of Egham, in the county of Surrey, Esq., Lieutenant-Colonel-Commandant of the 4th Royal Regiment of Surrey Local Militia, His Majesty's royal licence and authority, that he may (in testimony of his respect for the memory of his maternal great-aunt Lydia, widow and relict of George Challoner, of Hales-hall, in the parish of Cheadle, in the county of Stafford, under whose will he derives considerable property) assume and use the surname of Challoner, in addition to and after that of Bisse, and also bear the arms of Challoner quarterly with those of Bisse, ...

Family life

Memorial in Virginia Water's church to Challoner and his second wife, c1860s/70s.

He married, firstly, Anne, eldest daughter of Nicholas-Loftus Tottenham, MP (1745-11 March 1823), in June 1812, in Ireland, and in the peace following the Battle of Waterloo, went abroad on a Grand Tour with his wife. He came back when his mother died in 1816, returning generally to Naples, Italy 1817–1827. His father's illness accompanied his return alone from Naples. In 1828, he and his wife left Naples forever.

Anne died on 3 December or November 1857, (according to Burke (1863) at the implausible age of 82. Her younger sister was recorded in Burke (1958) as having died December 1865 aged 83, thus Anne could have been born c1780 or 1784 if 73 when died). This Anne was niece of the Anne Tottenham (1744–1775) of the Loftus Hall ghost story. Nicholas Loftus-Tottenham was the second son of Charles Tottenham (1716–1795), MP for New Ross, surveyor-general of Leinster, by Anne (1718–1768), second daughter of Nicholas Loftus, 1st Viscount Loftus. Nicholas Loftus-Tottenham was for 14 years the MP for Bannow 1776–1790 and the member for Clonmines from 1790 to 1797. He had married in May 1778 Mary (two sons, three daughters) daughter and co-heir of Sir James May, 1st Bt. Loftus-Tottenham was resident or associated with Loftus Hall, Fethard, co. Wexford; Duncannon, co. Waterford; Glenfarne, co. Leitrim; and Holles street, Dublin.

He married, secondly, on 6 January 1859, (Hadie) Henrietta Emma Helena De Salis (2 May 1824 – 16 August 1863) third surviving and youngest daughter of Count de Salis. There is a monumental inscription to them in Christ Church, Virginia Water (a church consecrated in 1838). In a book of memorandum he wrote:

'All real happiness in the world closed upon me by the death of my much loved and loving Hadie' (p.125, Cecil De Salis, 1939).

Challoner left his estate to her youngest brother, the Rev. Henry Jerome de Salis, whose third son was Charles Fane de Salis, a Bishop of Taunton. When Rev. Henry de Salis died in 1915 his eldest son Rodolph became tenant for life of the Portnall property. However, after a minor struggle with his next brother, he alienated it in 1923. Rodolph, a civil engineer, had in the meantime been a director of the Staffordshire Railway, a Challoner interest.

Death and legacy

When Challoner died on 26 July 1872 he left property valued under £120,000. Viscount Bridport and John Gooch Spicer of Spye Park, Wiltshire were his executors.

Career

Carte de visite of Bisse-Challoner, as Colonel of the Surrey militia.

Military service

He served as a lieutenant in the 1st Dragoon Guards (1809–1812).[Note 9] On 26 March 1853 he was commissioned as Lieutenant-Colonel Commandant of the new 3rd Royal Surrey Militia, based in Kingston upon Thames. On his retirement from this command he was appointed the regiment's Honorary Colonel on 2 November 1867, a position he held until his death.[12]

County Offices

He was appointed a Justice of the Peace (J.P.) of Berkshire (1831) and of Surrey, and a Deputy Lieutenant (D.L.) for Surrey. He became High Sheriff of Surrey in 1838.

Parliamentary candidate

He stood for the West Surrey constituency in the 1852 general election but lost with 1385 votes to Evelyn (with 1646 votes) and Henry Drummond (1610 votes) elected as Conservatives.[13]

Royal Agricultural Society of England

He was a member of the council and trustee of the Royal Agricultural Society of England from c. 1839–. He was chairman of the Finance Committee, Vice-chairman of the General Derby Committee,[14] and wrote several papers which appeared in the society journal. Papers included, Practical instructions for improving and economically maintaining turnpike and parish roads upon the mile system, volume 2, 1841; Report on the Exhibition and Trial of Implements at the Exeter Meeting, volume 11, 1850; and On the Accurate Levelling of Drains, volume 11, 1850.

Bagshot and Bedfont Turnpike Trust

He was chairman of the Bagshot and Bedfont Turnpike Trust, covering part of the road from London to Salisbury and Southampton and later on its subdivision trustee of its 'Western District' Turnpike.[15] He became Trustee of United Roads; of the Hampton to Staines Turnpike Trust; and a commissioner for the Surrey bank part of Staines Bridge from 1836 to 1871.

Seat and residences

Portnall Park, circa 1859. From a watercolour, a view from the south-east
Photo of a terrace at Portnall, mid to late 1800s.

Potnalls, Potenall, or Portnall Park, Virginia Water (then a pre-village within Egham's boundaries) was built c. 1770. In 1804, Thomas' father had it after exchange of land at Tite Hill, Egham (possibly land that had belonged to his maternal great-aunt Lydia Challoner) with David Jebb, the brother of John Jebb, FRS, then extended or re-built Portnall Park House. His son in turn extended it after 1828.

In 1872 Portnall was staffed by three men in the house; two in the stables; six or seven in the garden; nine or 10 maids; and four or five men on the farm, which encompassed, including rented land, 600 acres (2.4 km2).[16]

When sold to golf course pioneer and property developer Walter George Tarrant to form the core of the Wentworth Estate and Golf Course, Virginia Water for £15,000 in 1923, the mansion and estate comprised 196 acres (0.79 km2) with a 2,400 feet (0.73 km) frontage to the main road (the A30). The house had 27 or 30 bedrooms and dressing rooms. There was a 'large square block of stabling' (for 15 horses); a six-booth coach house; barn; cowsheds; bailiff's cottage; bothy; potting sheds; 'good' greenhouses; two walled gardens; five pairs of freehold cottages (three at Shrubs Hill and two at Knowle Hill); two lodge cottages; and a gardener's cottage.

From the 1830s through 1841 Col. Challoner was resident at 29 Portman Square. In January 1842, Boyle's Court Guide listed him at 169 New Bond Street (The Clarendon Hotel), and from 1843 until death at 11 Charles Street, Mayfair.

He had two renters' shares in Drury Lane Theatre and was a member of Brooks's (and the Garrick Club as an original member).

Arms

Bisse arms as granted to Col. Challoner, 28 December 1831.
  • 14 January 1829 : Challoner was authorised by Royal Licence/warrant to assume the name of Challoner 'in addition after Bisse'.
  • 28 December 1831 : he was granted the arms of Bisse (he was unsuccessful in trying to prove kin with the Bisse of Croscombe and Spargrove, Somerset)
  • 24 January 1832 : he was granted the arms of Challoner and Bisse.
  • Bisse-Challoner arms:
Sable on a pale argent three escallops of the field and for the crest on a wreath of the colours on a mount vert two serpents entwined respecting each other proper the heads encircling an escallop inverted or
On a wreath of the colours out waves a demi-sea-wolf issuant proper holding between the fins a cross patée sble and the crest of Bisse as the same as in the margin here of more plainly depicted'
Sable on a chevron cottised between three cherubins Or as many crosses patées fichés of the field for Challoner'
  • Tottenham arms:
Gules three bars dancettée argent

Gallery

Family portraits

Buildings

Art

Heraldry and Arms and silver

Notes and references

Notes

  1. ^ Other names: Colonel Thomas Chaloner Bisse-Challoner; Chaloner Bisse Challoner; Colonel C. B. Challoner; T.-C. Bisse-Challoner; Mr Bisse Challoner; Colonel Bisse Challoner (by 1828); Thomas Challoner Bisse; Thomas Bisse; my nephew Chaloner.
  2. ^ He enrolled at Trinity College, Oxford on 26 March 1806, aged 17.
  3. ^ William Smith was under 21 in 1747 and appears from his lack of more major inheritance to have died young.
  4. ^ Blackhorse Yard, Holborn – was formerly the Three horseshoe brewhouse yard
  5. ^ 246 and 247 High Street, Borough, Southwark was inherited from his first-cousin, Valentina Aynscombe (d.1841)
  6. ^ 86 shares in Sun Fire Office worth £17,200 in 1872
  7. ^ 54 shares in Sun Life Office inherited, indirectly, from his maternal-great-grandfather Robert Smith (d.1748)
  8. ^ 9,000 preference shares in the Trent & Mersey Canal and the North Staffordshire Railway inherited from his maternal-great-aunt, Lydia Challoner (d.1803), (a 1% holding worth £20,250 in 1872)
  9. ^ He served in the King's Dragoon Guards – Cornet: 9 March 1809; lieutenant: 1 August 1811.

References

  1. ^ At least 200 acres was owned outright and passed to the succeeding two next generations, the rest seems to have been rented during his lifetime.
  2. ^ Matriculation date
  3. ^ Prerogative Court of Canterbury PROB 11/916/349
  4. ^ Painting of William Townsend
  5. ^ Monumental inscription in All Saints, Fulham
  6. ^ Image of Lydia Archived 19 December 2014 at the Wayback Machine Staffs Past Track. Retrieved 2014-12-19.
  7. ^ a b Love Song, Duet[permanent dead link] Arts Council. Retrieved 2014-12-19.
  8. ^ 20 Geo. II, c. 7
  9. ^ GM
  10. ^ Prerogative Court of Canterbury
  11. ^ The London Gazette, Friday, 23 January 1829, no. 18543
  12. ^ Army List, various dates.
  13. ^ West Surrey constituency seat had a population of 102,856, of which 3,897 people were registered electors
  14. ^ The Farmer's Magazine, London, 1839
  15. ^ Documents of Horne Engall and Freeman Solicitors Records at the London Metropolitan Archives. Page 486 and others. Retrieved 2014-12-19.
  16. ^ (De Salis, 1939)
  17. ^ Art Prices Current, vol. 11, 1933, no. 1580

Other Sources

  • Select Illustrations of the County of Surrey: Comprising picturesque Views of the Seats of the Nobility and Gentry. Interesting remains, and with Descriptions ... , by George Frederick Prosser, and published by Rivington, London, 1828.
  • R. de Salis, Beneficiary Bisse : Colonel Chaloner Bisse-Challoner, heir and his heirs. London, 2008.
  • Edith Mary Johnston-Liik, History of the Irish Parliament 1692–1800, p. 422-3, volume six of six, 2002 (re. Tottenham family).
  • Alumni Oxonienses: 1715–1886, vol. 1, by Joseph Foster, James Parker & Co., London, 1891.
  • The Parliamentary Companion, for 1854, Charles R. Dod, London, Whittaker & Co., 1854.
  • Two scrolls from the College of Arms, and a schedule of Col. Challoner's estate in 1872.
  • Boyle's Fashionable Court and Country Guide, 1842, &tc, edited by M. Boyle, 290 Regent Street (five shillings), London.
  • Musgrave's Obituary, Harlean Society no. 44, six volumes, 1899–1901 (Sir William Musgrave, Bart.)
  • Rachel and Cecil de Salis, Notes of Past Days, Henley-on-Thames, 1939 (chapter 3, My Uncle Challoner, pps. 121–126).
  • R. G. Thorne, History of Parliament, The Commons 1790–1820, Secker & Warburg, 1986.
  • Walford's County Families, 1865.
  • The Mayors of Norwich 1403 to 1835, by Basil Cozens-Hardy, FSA and Ernest A. Kent, FSA, Jarrold and sons, Ltd, Norwich, 1938. (a note on Phillip Stebbing, page 101).
  • Seventeenth-Century Norwich, Politics, Religion and Government, 1620–1690, John T. Evans, Oxford, 1979.
  • Percy Millican, The Register of The Freeman of Norwich, 1548–1713, Jarrold, Norwich, 1934.
  • Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the High Court of Chancery: In the Time of Lord Chancellor Hardwicke [1736–1754], by John Tracy Atkyns, Philip Yorke Hardwicke, Great Britain Court of Chancery, William Newnam, Great Britain, Court of Chancery, Printed for J. Wenman, Oxford, 1781. (Frederick v Aynscombe, 1739).
  • Peter G. M. Dickson, The Sun Insurance Office, 1710–1960, Oxford, 1960.
  • Kim Sloan, 'A New Chronology for Alexander Cozens part II: 1759–86', The Burlington Magazine, Volume 127, No. 987 (June 1985), pp. 355–363.
  • Christie's London, British drawings sale, 15 June 1982, lots 5 – 10 (works associated with Charlotte Aynscombe (1760–1799)).
  • L.C.C., Survey of London, volume 22, Bankside, Sir H. Roberts & Walter Godfrey (editors), 1950.
  • Topographical Dictionary, London and its Environs, etc., by James Elmes, M.R.I.A., Architect; Surveyor to the Port of London; London. Whittaker, Treacher and Arnot, MDCCCXXXI (1831).
  • Sermons on Practical Subjects, by the late Reverend Henry Stebbing [d.1788], D.D., preacher to the Hon. Society of Gray's Inn, Chaplain in Ordinary to His Majesty, and Fellow of the Royal and Antiquarian Societies, London, with an essay by Henry Stebbing [1752–1818], printed for C. Dilly, in the Poultry, 1788.
  • The Lady Magazine, 1831. (Mr & Mrs Bisse Challoner were presented to the Queen at her birthday ball at Christ's Hospital.
  • The Registers of Wadham College, Oxford, part 1, 1613–1719, by Rev. Robert Barlow Gardiner, MA, FSA, George Bell, Covent Garden, 1889.
  • The Registers of Wadham College, Oxford, part 2, 1719–1871, by Rev. Robert Barlow Gardiner, MA, FSA, George Bell, Covent Garden, 1895.
  • Prerogative Court of Canterbury (P.C.C.) wills for, amongst others: Daniel Wight (1705); Elizabeth Aynscombe (1713); Philip Stebbing (1715); Jane Elliott (1718); Thomas Aynscombe (1740); Robert Smith (1748); George Challoner (1770); Charlotte Anne Aynscombe (1799); Lydia Challoner (1803); Rev. Thomas Bisse (1828); Valentina Aynscombe (1841); and Mary Barnard (1842). (Available on-line from P.R.O. Kew, aka National Archives).
  • The Virginia Water Picture Book by Ron and Dorothy Davis, Egham-by-Runnymede Historical Society, Surrey, 1989.
Honorary titles
Preceded by High Sheriff of Surrey
1838
Succeeded by

Warning: Default sort key "Bisse Challoner, Thomas Chaloner" overrides earlier default sort key "Salis, Peter". Category:1788 births Category:1872 deaths Category:People educated at Eton College Category:Alumni of Trinity College, Oxford Category:Deputy Lieutenants of Surrey Category:High Sheriffs of Surrey Category:People from Egham Category:Burials in Surrey Category:People from Virginia Water

London Gazette, April 8 to April 11, 1809, announces grant of Royal Licence to Jerome De Salis, and his descendants, to assume & use title of Count in UK.
JeromedeSalisseal&signature.jpg

Early life residences

(4th) Count de Salis.
His third mother-in-law, Catherine Letitia Leslie, aka Mrs. Foster

Children

Henrietta Foster (1785–1856) Jerome's 3rd wife.
Henrietta (Harriet), (1785–1856), daughter of Lord Bishop Foster, & 3rd wife to Jerome, Count de Salis. Painted by François/Frans van Dorne (1776-1848), in Paris, circa 1816-18, 10 x 8 inches, oil-on-copper (now at Tabley House).
Henrietta (Harriet) Foster, aka Countess de Salis (1785–1856).


Refugee photos vandalisticaly removed in March 2020

Some of these are in Commons

Arcadian Landscape

External

Postcard of Palazzo Salis-Zizers (now Sertoli-Salis), Tirano. Sent from Lecco to Bern, franked 2 June 1911.
Early à Salis shield.
Basic shield and crest de/von Salis heraldic design. This version of c.1952.

von Cramm

UK Royal Licence granted to the 4th Count on 4 April 1809,[6] reiterating in English the 1748 Imperial patent


other things

Local

Flowers on Grave was my photo of SAS founder Lord Jellicoe, a valid picture for Wikipedia, again sadly removed.Rodolph2 (talk) 20:13, 4 March 2014 (UTC)

File:Dawley Court, Middlesex in 1929.jpg (A record of an image, that has been reduced to uselessness. But is available from me via e-mail).

R:M:B-Rachel, Countess of Bath/Middlesex, daughter of Francis Fane, 1st Earl of Westmorland


Alfred Hitchens (1861–1942), Harvest Scene, in pastels, 8 x 10.5 inches.jpg

File:A Time for Gifts Craxton cover.jpg(A record of an image, btw I'd like to have a copy of my original photo from Wikipedia please, as this copy is a travesty and abuse of my generosity in having given you my hard won art-work!)

Some images uploaded by me:

SAS wreath on Jellicoe's grave 2007

(deleted)

Fingask Castle's Royal Coat

(deleted)

(moved to Commons)

(moved to Commons)

Signature and wax seal of Jerome de Salis (1771–1836).
Envoy 1st Count Peter's paternal-grandfather, Antonio de Salis-Soglio (1609–1682), founder Casa Antonio. Landshauptmann.[7]
Distant dynast, (six generations back from 1st Count Peter): Gubertus 'Magnus' à Salis-Soglio (d.1490).[8]
Son of Gubertus Magnus (d.1490): Andreas à Salis (1492–1547 or 49), 1st Commissioner of Chiavenna.[9]

Wood Pasture

Aldermaston Court is amidst an ancient and derelict wood pasture.

Ancient veteran pollard oak in western Berkshire's Aldermaston Court's derelict wood pasture.
Ancient veteran pollard oak in western Berkshire's Aldermaston Court's derelict wood pasture.
Ancient veteran pollard oak in western Berkshire's Aldermaston Court's derelict wood pasture.

To restore?

File:Flowersongrave.jpg (my photo of SAS wreath, for Lord Jellicoe) - deleted as orphaned with no forseeable use. Is there a page you can see this being used in ? File:PashaNikAksenovPantherHouseMountPleasant2003.jpg (my photo-very good contemporary art image) - the subject (painter) is not identified. Was deleted as there was no forseeable use without identification. File:TidcombeModel.JPG (good photo by me of a 3-d thing) - photo of a model house with a (?) wax snowman in front. - deleted as orphaned with no forseeable use. Is there a page you can see this being used in ? File:GlassSlideofCulloden.jpg (good pre-1900 image/scan) - The slide is not dated, are you sure this is pre-1900 ? File:DecoyPigeons.jpg (my photo-good of decoy doves) - was deleted as orphaned and no forseeable encyclopedic use. Is there a page you can see this being used in ? File:FingSilhouetteSteveAbbott23Feb2.jpg (permission from Steve Abbott) File:Litup.jpg (Nick Thackeray) - OTRS permission not given. No free licence nominated by the copyright holder File:Jinkers.jpg (Nick Thackeray - OTRS permission not given. No free licence nominated by the copyright holder File:Fingask40thBirthday.jpg (Nick Thackeray - OTRS permission not given. No free licence nominated by the copyright holder File:Fingaskreeling.jpg (Nick Thackeray) - OTRS permission not given. No free licence nominated by the copyright holder File:FingaskTrio.jpg (Nick Thackeray, has given permission for all the above photos. -OTRS-possibly not, can't remember) - OTRS permission not given. No free licence nominated by the copyright holder File:GeorgeJellicoe3.jpg (public figure, anon. photo, taken during the 1939-45 war) - almost certainly copyrighted. Even if the subject is correct you can't be sure this is in the public domain until 70 years after the end of his service...say 2018 to be safe. If the photographer is discoverable then it may be in copyright for much longer. File:EarlJellicoe.jpg (photo by Philippa Jellicoe/Dunne, his widow, who has given permission, indirect OTRS) restored - found the OTRS email File:JellicoeGrin.jpg (photo by Philippa Jellicoe/Dunne, his widow, who has given permission) restored - found the OTRS email File:JellicoeSkiing.jpg (photo by Philippa Jellicoe/Dunne, his widow, who has given permission) restored - found the OTRS email File:PeersRobes1970s.jpg (Lord Jellicoe-public figure. Photo by his brother-in-law, Sir Thomas Dunne, KG, who has given permission) no OTRS permission for this image. File:Baghdad.JPG (photo by Philippa Jellicoe/Dunne, his widow, who has given permission)) - no OTRS permission for this image. File:JarvisJune2005bySamWhatmore.jpg

Reading Abbey vandalism by Bald Boris, 2015

Kingsclere vandalism by Bald Boris

less likely

File:Isabel Lambert catalogues.jpg; File:Moncreiffe of that Ilk bookcover.jpg; File:The World through Blunted sight cover.jpg; File:Marlborough Gallery Bacon catalogue.jpg; File:Sonia Leon by Craxton Christopher Hull Gallery catalogue.jpg; File:Roumeli cover by Craxton.jpg; File:CraxtoncoversforPMLF.jpg; File:Mani by Patrick Leigh Fermor.jpg; File:KitchenerJellicoe French.jpg|Kitchener, Jellicoe & French (Earl of Ypres);

*Being a Wiki editor can be a deeply dispiriting and depressing experience.

  • One can be exposed to the whimsy of officious minds and latent neo-fascism of the petty sub-manager.
  • It would'nt matter if they were applying the rules correctly or fairly but no it they tend to get it wrong.
  • Imagine if the job of issuing parking tickets was allowed to all, some folk would get the job done ok, but others might start giving you a ticket when you've correctly parked in your own driveway.
  • Some can't take improvements to what they consider their pages.
  • As an editor I only add, I try never to delete someone else's work.
  • Stefan2 is a spiteful wrecking-ball., so said, Italick (talk) 22:33, 13 August 2014 (UTC), a moot point re. his over cautious or officious interpretation of the law?

References

  1. ^ Opere Ligariane in Coira by Camillo Bassi, 1939.
  2. ^ Photographien der Bilder von Vorfahren der Familie von Salis, Chur, 1884
  3. ^ From page 228 of volume IV of Views of the Seats of Noblemen and Gentlemen in England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland. Second Series, by John Preston Neale, 1824. Engraved by William Alexander Le Petit (1804 - 1896).
  4. ^ Vicar des Veltlins. Sealed a treaty between The League of the Ten Jurisdictions with Zürich und Glarus, 1590. Son of Rudolf (d.1587), Richter zu Malans, Landeshauptmann im Veltlin 1569, Herr zu Wyneck, "der edle fromme Junker". 'IUNCKER ANDEREAS VON SALLIS ANO 1587' [sic].
  5. ^ & Illustrissimo Signor Capitano Don Battista de Salis di Coira, 1766.
  6. ^ Fane de Salis MSS/Sammlung Fane de Salis
  7. ^ Photographien der Bilder von Vorfahren der Familie von Salis, Chur, 1884.
  8. ^ Photographien der Bilder von Vorfahren der Familie von Salis, Chur, 1884.
  9. ^ Photographien der Bilder von Vorfahren der Familie von Salis, Chur, 1884.


DAVOREN

Vesey Alfred O'Davoren (Davoren) (Dublin, 8 December 1888 – LA, 30 May 1989), British soldier and film actor.[1]

File:Miniature of Captain Vesey O'Davoren presented January 15 1916 by the artist John Morley.jpg
Miniature of Captain Vesey O'Davoren, presented 15 January 1916, by the artist John Morley.

Life

Davoren was a son of Vesey Henry William Davoren (1862–1944), an Irish surgeon, Major R.A.M.C.,[2] His mother was Edith Anne, daughter of Alfred Hoyte, late Surgeon 61st Regiment. His parents had married in January 1888 and by 1915 they were living at Geeler House, Risbygate, Bury St Edmunds and Mrs Davoren was President of the local branch of the League of Pity.[3] There is a Davoren Walk in Bury.

His father was educated at St. Paul's School, London; Trinity College Dublin (TCD); and R.C.S.I. He qualified L.R.C.S.I., 1884 and L.R.C.P.I., 1886, and entered A.M.S. 1887. He was promoted Major, 1889 and retired 1907. He was Mayor of Bury St. Edmunds in 1912. He was re-employed during World War I at Bury St. Edmund's and died at Redhill, 23 January 1944.[4]

His younger brother Lucius Andrew Vesey Davoren held a patent for an Improved method of mechanically wiping goggles or other translucent eye protectors (1933/34).

World War I

He enrolled in the British Army's 7th Suffolk Regiment, under the command of Colonel Charles Douglas Parry Crooke. In October 1915 his Company (B) was massacred in action around the Hohenzollern Redoubt, just after the Battle of Loos.

The 7th Battalion of the Suffolk Regiment's War Diary,[5] 13 October 1915, states that:

Davoren ... was wounded [shot in foot and then side] in the action on the Hohenzollern Redoubt on 11 October, but continued to lead his Company until killed by a shot from a machine gun.

-Officers Killed

  • Major Currey (Vere Fortrey), ("an unsurpassed linguist". Killed commanding ‘B’ Company in the first attack upon the south side of the "Hair-pin");
  • Captain Cobbold (Charles Augustus), (a pre-war director of the brewing magnates Ind, Coope and Co.);
  • Captain Sorley (Charles Hamilton) (the poet);
  • Lieutenant Gedge (Peter);
  • Lieutenant Wood (Geoffrey Dayrell);
  • 2/Lieutenant Hartopp (Charles William Liddell);
  • 2/Lieutenant Lee (Richard).

-Severely wounded

  • 2/Lieutenant Smith (Donald Claude) died that day.

-Officers Wounded

  • Major Henty (George Herbert), (died 30 November 1917)

and

  • Lieutenant Davoren (V. A.) [only survivor].

Davoren was rescued, carried for two miles, by Sergeant-Major Martin, of Bury.[6]

Film career

In his youth, as an undergraduate, before World War I he acted in Dublin's Abbey Theatre.[7] In the 1914–1919 war he was wounded thrice and was at one time reported dead. He temporarily lost his voice in a German mustard gas attack, and was given six months to live if he moved to a dry climate. He arrived in Hollywood, California, with his wife in 1920 where he acted in silent films before recovering his voice. He also directed plays and was in an early Hollywood Bowl production of The Pied Piper, taking the title role. He had changed his name to O'Davoren on arriving in America, on applying for U.S. Citizenship, perhaps aware of the romanticism of the Clann O'Dabhoireann and the American fondness for things Irish.[8] Between 1927 and 1957, he appeared in circa 67 films, mostly as butlers.[7][9]

1920s (x1)
1930s (x43)
1940s (x9)
1950s (x14)

Wife

File:Ivy de Verley, Mrs Vesey O'Davoren, painted by John Morley & presented to her husband in 1916, 3 x 2.5 inches, oval.jpg
Ivy de Verley aka Mrs. Vesey O'Davoren, presented 15 January 1916, by the artist John Morley.

Ivy Flossie 'Madame' de Verley, (Kingston, Jamaica, 27 July 1879 – Los Angeles, U.S.A., 27 December 1963, aged 84), daughter of Jamaican merchant Louis Francois Verley (1817–1901).[12] She survived the November 1907 Kingston earthquake, though her first husband (she had married Richard Walter Bradley in 1905) was killed,[13] they lived at lived at Bamboo Cottage, Kingston. A portrait painter. She was photographed by James McBey.

Involved with or conducted the Scarab Salon in London she was said to have studied with Sir William Orpen and Richard Jack, R.A. (1866–1952). She also studied in Berlin with Clara Berkowski (Königsberg, 1857–). She made portraits of, amongst others, Nola Luxford, Raymond Blathwayte (1855–1935), (journalist and film actor), James McBey, Alan Odle and Halliwell Hobbes. Some of her "Life Masks" were shown at the New York Independent exhibition (Raymond Blathwayte and James McBey), and at the Southwest Museum, the spring exhibition known as "Selected Work by Western Painters", Los Angeles Museum, May 1922/1923.

She also exhibited at: Independents, NYC, 1924, Society of Independent Artists, the Waldorf-Astoria, New York, from 7 to 30 March, inclusive.[14] and Salons of America.

Her works were in the collections of the: Civic Club, NYC; Orange Co. (CA) Museum Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA); Freelance Art League (LA), 1925; Pasadena Art Institute, Pasadena, 1928; Ebell Club (LA), 1920s (she was a member); Surf and Sand Club, Hermosa Beach, California, 1925; Friday Morning Club (LA), 1930.[15][16][17]

They married on or by 15 January 1916, perhaps having met while he was in the Chelsea Hospital, London.[18]

In 1922 she and Vesey had built a 2,500 square foot house in West Hollywood, California, in Hollywood's Sunset Strip, near Beverly Boulevard and Sunset Las Palmas Studios, at 2049 North Las Palmas Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90068. It still exists.[19] [20]

References

  1. ^ spanning silent, black and white, colour and tv)
  2. ^ Son of Lieutenant Colonel Vesey Davoren, JP, and Agnes, daughter of Richard Jeffreys, J.P., of Swansea, Major 23rd Regiment.
  3. ^ Bury Free Press, October 1915.
  4. ^ IRISH MEDICAL OBITUARY. Compiled by T. PERCY C. KIRKPATRICK, 1948.
  5. ^ Suffolk Regiment's War Diary, Suffolk Record Office in Bury St Edmunds.
  6. ^ 'The Gallant 7th Suffolks.'/ 'Charge for the Hohenzollern Redoubt.'/ 'Lieut. Vesey A. Davoren wounded.'/ 'Heroic Rescue by Bury NCO.', Bury Free Press, 30 October 1915.
  7. ^ a b 'Find a Grave', with thanks to Frank Reighter (1938–2017)
  8. ^ The O'Davorens of Cahermacnaughten, Burren, Co. Clare by Dr. George U. Macnamara, 'Journal of the North Munster Archaeological Society' 4:2 (1913), pages 194–211.
  9. ^ a b IMDB
  10. ^ Thanks to Frank Reighter (1938–2017). Organizer (1987–1995) of the Three Stooges Conventions, and the Three Stooges Fan Club Meetings (1999–2015).
  11. ^ Alan Goble, The Complete Index to Literary Sources in Film, Walter de Gruyter, 1999.
  12. ^ Of Verley & Robinson Ltd, which had a wharf in Kingston, Jamaica, and issued their own currency or aluminium token system, for loaves of bread, such as 'GOOD FOR 1d LOAF'. (Dix Noonan Webb, Mayfair, April 2014, Lot 924, KINGSTON, Verley & Robinson Ltd, square aluminium Three-Halfpence Loaf, Verley & Robinson ltd, stamped 4451, rev. value, 1.73g/12h (Lyall 211; cf. Prid. 155; Roehrs 1221). Very fine and very rare £100–150).
  13. ^ The son of Dr Samuel Messenger Bradley, Bradley went to Magdalene College, Cambridge to read Maths.
  14. ^ no jury, no prizes
  15. ^ Edan Milton Hughes, "Artists in California, 1786–1940", 2002 (third edition), Crocker Art Museum, page 146.
  16. ^ Nancy Dustin Wall Moure Southern California Artists 1890 – 1940, 1979
  17. ^ Ferdinand Perret (1888–1960) research files and material on California art and artists, 1769–1942
  18. ^ A wedding present of miniature portraits of the couple are inscribed on their backs: miniature of Captain Vesey O'Davoren presented to his wife on the occasion of their marriage 15 January 1916 by the artist John Morley. Captain O'Davoren fought in the world war, attached to the 7th Suffolk Regiment & was wounded 3 times & gassed and miniature of Ivy de Verley (portrait painter) who is Mrs Vesey O'Davoren, painted by John Morley & presented to her husband in 1916– (3 x 2.5 inches, oval), by John Morley, possibly this is the British surgeon John Morley (1885–1974), Croix de Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur; MRCS and FRCS 1911; MB ChB Manchester 1908; ChM 1911; LRCP 1911. A master surgical craftsman, Professor of Surgery in Manchester. He was invalided home at the end of 1915 with severe jaundice and dysentery and he spent the rest of the war doing his military duties, civilian hospital work, and private practice at the same time.'
  19. ^ Sold (for sale) in 2017/2018 for $1,499,000.
  20. ^ Is it just us, or does the rent on this 1922 Hollywood one-bedroom, one bath two-story Spanish style house seem kind of reasonable? The house was originally built for actress [sic] Vessey [sic] O'Davoren, who the listing claims was in 'London by Night' and 'Hounds [sic] of the Baskervilles'. (Although IMDB begs to differ.) The two-story house, which is roughly 800 square feet [sic], features hardwood floors, refrigerator and dishwasher, and a one car garage. The real estate agents are asking $1,800 per month [$6,046 per month in 2018] for a one-year lease. LA Curbed, 'Rent Check: 1920's Hollywood Hills Guest House', by Marissa Gluck, 2 February 2009, 12:13pm PST
  • Alan Goble, The Complete Index to Literary Sources in Film, Walter de Gruyter, 1999.
  • Bury Free Press, Bury St Edmunds' newspaper, Suffolk, UK, 30 October 1915
  • Edan Milton Hughes, Artists in California, 1786–1940, 2002 (third edition), Crocker Art Museum, page 146.
  • Nancy Dustin Wall Moure, Southern California Artists 1890 – 1940, 1979.


Warning: Default sort key "Davoren, Vesey Alfred" overrides earlier default sort key "Bisse Challoner, Thomas Chaloner". Category:1888 births]] Category:1989 deaths]] Category:Alumni of Trinity College Dublin]] Category:English centenarians]] Category:British centenarians]] Category:Irish centenarians]] Category:American centenarians]] Category:People educated at St Paul's School, London]] Category:People from Bury St Edmunds]] Category:20th-century male actors]] Category:British Army personnel of World War I]] Category:Suffolk Regiment officers]] Category:20th-century English male actors]] Category:British expatriates in the United States]] Category:Irish expatriates in the United States]] Category:20th-century British male actors]] Category:20th-century Irish male actors]] Category:British male film actors]] Category:British male stage actors]] Category:Irish male film actors]] Category:Abbey Theatre]] Category:American male television actors]] Category:British male television actors]] Category:Irish male actors]] Category:English emigrants to the United States]] Category:British emigrants to the United States]] Category:Irish emigrants to the United States]] Category:20th-century American male actors]]


Thomas-Chaloner Bisse-Challoner[Note 1] DL, JP (1788–1872) was a British militia colonel who enlarged the former country house and landscape garden in 600 acres (2.4 km2) at Portnall Park, Virginia Water, then considered Egham Heath, sitting on the Bagshot Formation.[1] This laid the foundation for the Wentworth Estate and many of the opulent houses of the sparesly populated area, alongside its proximity to Windsor and Windsor Great Park as the British royal family's wealth and connections expanded enabling them to set up nearby grand homes. He inherited much of his fortune principally via his great-aunt Lydia Challoner and cousin Valentina Aynscombe.

Ancestry, early life, education and family life

Colonel Challoner was the only son of the Rev. Thomas Bisse (c.1754-d.13 November 1828), of Portnall Park, Virginia Water and Katherine Townsend (d.1815/16) daughter of Anne Smith, a daughter of merchant Robert Smith, of London and Mortlake.

He was educated at Eton College (c1802-1805) and Trinity College, Oxford.[Note 2]

Father

His father, the Rev. Thomas Bisse, armigerous according to Oxford, attended Wadham College from 1 July 1772,[2] aged 18, and been awarded a BA, 19 April 1776, Battels Christmas 1783, and MA, 22 May 1783. Appointed curate at Kingswear, Exeter in 1784. Rev. Thomas Bisse was the son Thomas Bisse of London (Thomae Bisse de Civ. Londin:), (‘’a gent.’’, again according to Oxford University), possibly the Rev. Thomas Bisse, A.M., chaplain of New College (and All Souls) 1729 and 1732, a nephew or son of the Rev. Dr. Thomas Bisse (1675–1731) preacher at the Rolls Chapel, London, author of The Beauties of Holiness, 1716 and prebend then chancellor of Hereford, and hence was also nephew or son of Philip Bisse, FRS (elected 13 June 1706), Bishop of Hereford.

However, his father is more likely to have been Thomas Bisse (d.1766) Drawing master of Christ's Hospital from 1754 to 1766, successor to Alexander Cozens, who mentions a son Thomas, a brother William, niece Joan, and late wife Susanna in his will.[3][failed verification] (Bernard Lens II was also a Christ's Hospital Drawing Master).

Dr. and Bishop Bisse were sons of Rev. John Bisse, Rector of Oldbury from 1659/60, co. Gloucester (c1638-d.1686, buried 19 July), who had matriculated Wadham College 28 March 1655. He was son of Thomas Bisse of Lullington, Somerset, and grandson of Thomas Bisse, and great-grandson of Dr. Phillip Bisse (c.1540 – October 1613) who had been Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford 1561–65, Archdeacon of Taunton, a benefactor of All Souls and had made the inaugural gift of 2,000 books to Wadham College Library. Their mother, Joyce Giles, died 8 September 1717, aged 80 (Historical Register Chronicle 1714–1738), via Musgrave).

A cousin, Philip Bisse (c.1611–1642, killed by Irish), a grandson of Dr. Philip Bisse, the Wadham benefactor, was Archdeacon of Cloyne, and possibly he for whom the Bisse arms were registered in Ireland, 25 May 1637.

Half-brother

William Chaloner Bisse (1822–1849) was the Rev. Thomas Bisse's son by his second wife, Charlotte, whom he married in 1818, a daughter of Charles Price of Knightsbridge. His aunt Elizabeth Price married 24 June 1799 Jonathan Raine (1763–1831), of Lincoln's Inn and 33 Bedford Row, KC, a Yorkshire born, sometime MP for various Cornish constituencies, and eventually a Welsh judge. Charlotte was left £1,000 per annum, as fixed by my marriage settlement when Thomas Bisse died in 1828. At the same time William was left five shares in the Stafford and Worcester Canal.

He became an Ensign in the 73rd Regiment of Foot on 12 March 1841; was promoted to Lieutenant on 5 April 1844; and to Captain on 12 May 1848. However, he died in Ireland on 8 June 1849 aged 27 and lies buried at Templemore in Tipperary, where his 'brother officers' erected a marble tablet in the chancel of the New Church.

Family tree

Six generation ancestral table connecting families of Aynscombe, Smith, Challoner, Wight, Townsend, Bisse, de Salis, inter alia.

Challoner's maternal great–grandfather Robert Smith (c. 1672–1748), a freeman of London, of Thames Street, London and Mortlake, was the common ancestor.

Smith had ten children:

  • Alice who married Mr. Owirk.
  • Ann(e) who married John Townsend, had:
    • William of Fulham House (1741–1823)[4][5]
    • Mary Barnard, d. Little Chelsea (16 April 1842, aged 90), widow of Prebend of Peterborough)
    • Katherine Bisse (died 1816), had:
      • Thomas-Chaloner Bisse(-Chaloner)
  • Lydia (1714–1803), married Thomas Waters (died 1738), then George Challoner (died 1770) of Hales Hall,[6] Cheadle, Staffordshire. Later she was of Tite Hill, Egham.[7]
  • Elizabeth who married Joseph Pouschon;
  • Lillie Aynscombe (c. 1715 – 1791, buried Clewer, Berkshire) – by Private Act of Parliament of 1747 he changed his surname.[8] He was a director of the Sun Fire Office from, at latest, 1754 until his death in 1791. He married Valentina Aynscombe (died 1771, buried Clewer) most direct descendant and beneficiary of Thomas Aynscombe (died 1740) of Charterhouse Square. Her father Philip Aynscombe (died Boulogne 1737) had married Valentina (died 1745), of St. George, Hanover Square, daughter and heir of Daniel Wight III of Southwark.
  • Sarah;
  • Catherine (Miss Kitty Smith) (died Brompton 1807), married 31 March 1758, Rev. William Fraigneau (1717–1778). Fraigneau was fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, tutor to family of Frederick, Lord Bolingbroke and Rector of Beckenham (1765–1778), Kent and Vicar of Battersea (1758–1778). Cambridge's Regius Professor of Greek 1744–1750;
  • Phoebe (died Fulham, 29 March 1821)[9] married Mr. Richard McPhedris/Macphradris/Macpheadris. She was a subscriber to the first edition of Ann Yearsley's Poems on Several Occasions, 1785, and was listed (with her niece and visitant Mrs Porter), as a £1 subscriber to the Gentleman's Magazine (May 1813);
  • Jane (1720 – 17 July 1793, aged 73), married, 1751, Rev. Dr. Henry Stebbing, FRS, FSA, (died 1788), son of the divine Rev. Henry Stebbing (1687–1763), and had two children: Henry (barrister) of Brompton Row, and Anne Duval. Henry Stebbing III (1752–1817) produced Sermons on Practical Subjects (1788), by the late Reverend Henry Stebbing, D.D., preacher to the Hon. Society of Gray's Inn; and
  • William (who was left £4,000 and Mortlake property)[Note 3]

Robert Smith had given Lillie £10,000 on marriage and half his trade and 50 shares in the Sun Fire Office.[10] When Lillie died in 1791 The Scots Magazine, (vol. 53, p. 102), reported :

10. At his seat at Mortlake, Lillie Ainscombe, Esq; one of the directors of the Sun Fire assurance–office. He has left seven sisters, whose ages, computed with his own, some little time before his death, made 572 years.

Lillie left three daughters (who died without surviving issue (sine prole)):

  • Valentina Aynscombe (c. 1749 – 23 March 1841 (G.M. 556), aged 92) – Col. Challoner inherited various properties and pictures from her.
  • Mary Aynscombe (died 1828) married the Rev. John Mossop (1774–1849), vicar of Hothfield, Kent 1802–1849.
  • Charlotte Anne Aynscombe, (1760, Clewer, Berkshire – 1799, Mortlake, Surrey).

Inherited wealth

Challoner inherited stocks, homes, and residues from: his maternal-great aunt (including ten shares in Trent Navigation) Lydia Challoner of Egham (died 1803), via his father (died 1828), by which time they were referred to as: the twenty canal shares now recently made forty; from his aunt Mary Barnard of Fulham (and Dorset?) (died 1842); and from his mother's first cousin Valentina Aynscombe of Mortlake (died 1841).

Change of name

In 1829, the authorities permitted him to extend his surname: The London Gazette announced this: Whitehall, 22 January 1829.[11]

The King has been pleased to give and grant unto Thomas Challoner Bisse of Portnall-park, in the parish of Egham, in the county of Surrey, Esq., Lieutenant-Colonel-Commandant of the 4th Royal Regiment of Surrey Local Militia, His Majesty's royal licence and authority, that he may (in testimony of his respect for the memory of his maternal great-aunt Lydia, widow and relict of George Challoner, of Hales-hall, in the parish of Cheadle, in the county of Stafford, under whose will he derives considerable property) assume and use the surname of Challoner, in addition to and after that of Bisse, and also bear the arms of Challoner quarterly with those of Bisse, ...

Family life

Memorial in Virginia Water's church to Challoner and his second wife, c1860s/70s.

He married, firstly, Anne, eldest daughter of Nicholas-Loftus Tottenham, MP (1745-11 March 1823), in June 1812, in Ireland, and in the peace following the Battle of Waterloo, went abroad on a Grand Tour with his wife. He came back when his mother died in 1816, returning generally to Naples, Italy 1817–1827. His father's illness accompanied his return alone from Naples. In 1828, he and his wife left Naples forever.

Anne died on 3 December or November 1857, (according to Burke (1863) at the implausible age of 82. Her younger sister was recorded in Burke (1958) as having died December 1865 aged 83, thus Anne could have been born c1780 or 1784 if 73 when died). This Anne was niece of the Anne Tottenham (1744–1775) of the Loftus Hall ghost story. Nicholas Loftus-Tottenham was the second son of Charles Tottenham (1716–1795), MP for New Ross, surveyor-general of Leinster, by Anne (1718–1768), second daughter of Nicholas Loftus, 1st Viscount Loftus. Nicholas Loftus-Tottenham was for 14 years the MP for Bannow 1776–1790 and the member for Clonmines from 1790 to 1797. He had married in May 1778 Mary (two sons, three daughters) daughter and co-heir of Sir James May, 1st Bt. Loftus-Tottenham was resident or associated with Loftus Hall, Fethard, co. Wexford; Duncannon, co. Waterford; Glenfarne, co. Leitrim; and Holles street, Dublin.

He married, secondly, on 6 January 1859, (Hadie) Henrietta Emma Helena De Salis (2 May 1824 – 16 August 1863) third surviving and youngest daughter of Count de Salis. There is a monumental inscription to them in Christ Church, Virginia Water (a church consecrated in 1838). In a book of memorandum he wrote:

'All real happiness in the world closed upon me by the death of my much loved and loving Hadie' (p.125, Cecil De Salis, 1939).

Challoner left his estate to her youngest brother, the Rev. Henry Jerome de Salis, whose third son was Charles Fane de Salis, a Bishop of Taunton. When Rev. Henry de Salis died in 1915 his eldest son Rodolph became tenant for life of the Portnall property. However, after a minor struggle with his next brother, he alienated it in 1923. Rodolph, a civil engineer, had in the meantime been a director of the Staffordshire Railway, a Challoner interest.

Death and legacy

When Challoner died on 26 July 1872 he left property valued under £120,000. Viscount Bridport and John Gooch Spicer of Spye Park, Wiltshire were his executors.

Career

Carte de visite of Bisse-Challoner, as Colonel of the Surrey militia.

Military service

He served as a lieutenant in the 1st Dragoon Guards (1809–1812).[Note 9] On 26 March 1853 he was commissioned as Lieutenant-Colonel Commandant of the new 3rd Royal Surrey Militia, based in Kingston upon Thames. On his retirement from this command he was appointed the regiment's Honorary Colonel on 2 November 1867, a position he held until his death.[12]

County Offices

He was appointed a Justice of the Peace (J.P.) of Berkshire (1831) and of Surrey, and a Deputy Lieutenant (D.L.) for Surrey. He became High Sheriff of Surrey in 1838.

Parliamentary candidate

He stood for the West Surrey constituency in the 1852 general election but lost with 1385 votes to Evelyn (with 1646 votes) and Henry Drummond (1610 votes) elected as Conservatives.[13]

Royal Agricultural Society of England

He was a member of the council and trustee of the Royal Agricultural Society of England from c. 1839–. He was chairman of the Finance Committee, Vice-chairman of the General Derby Committee,[14] and wrote several papers which appeared in the society journal. Papers included, Practical instructions for improving and economically maintaining turnpike and parish roads upon the mile system, volume 2, 1841; Report on the Exhibition and Trial of Implements at the Exeter Meeting, volume 11, 1850; and On the Accurate Levelling of Drains, volume 11, 1850.

Bagshot and Bedfont Turnpike Trust

He was chairman of the Bagshot and Bedfont Turnpike Trust, covering part of the road from London to Salisbury and Southampton and later on its subdivision trustee of its 'Western District' Turnpike.[15] He became Trustee of United Roads; of the Hampton to Staines Turnpike Trust; and a commissioner for the Surrey bank part of Staines Bridge from 1836 to 1871.

Seat and residences

Portnall Park, circa 1859. From a watercolour, a view from the south-east
Photo of a terrace at Portnall, mid to late 1800s.

Potnalls, Potenall, or Portnall Park, Virginia Water (then a pre-village within Egham's boundaries) was built c. 1770. In 1804, Thomas' father had it after exchange of land at Tite Hill, Egham (possibly land that had belonged to his maternal great-aunt Lydia Challoner) with David Jebb, the brother of John Jebb, FRS, then extended or re-built Portnall Park House. His son in turn extended it after 1828.

In 1872 Portnall was staffed by three men in the house; two in the stables; six or seven in the garden; nine or 10 maids; and four or five men on the farm, which encompassed, including rented land, 600 acres (2.4 km2).[16]

When sold to golf course pioneer and property developer Walter George Tarrant to form the core of the Wentworth Estate and Golf Course, Virginia Water for £15,000 in 1923, the mansion and estate comprised 196 acres (0.79 km2) with a 2,400 feet (0.73 km) frontage to the main road (the A30). The house had 27 or 30 bedrooms and dressing rooms. There was a 'large square block of stabling' (for 15 horses); a six-booth coach house; barn; cowsheds; bailiff's cottage; bothy; potting sheds; 'good' greenhouses; two walled gardens; five pairs of freehold cottages (three at Shrubs Hill and two at Knowle Hill); two lodge cottages; and a gardener's cottage.

From the 1830s through 1841 Col. Challoner was resident at 29 Portman Square. In January 1842, Boyle's Court Guide listed him at 169 New Bond Street (The Clarendon Hotel), and from 1843 until death at 11 Charles Street, Mayfair.

He had two renters' shares in Drury Lane Theatre and was a member of Brooks's (and the Garrick Club as an original member).

Arms

Bisse arms as granted to Col. Challoner, 28 December 1831.
  • 14 January 1829 : Challoner was authorised by Royal Licence/warrant to assume the name of Challoner 'in addition after Bisse'.
  • 28 December 1831 : he was granted the arms of Bisse (he was unsuccessful in trying to prove kin with the Bisse of Croscombe and Spargrove, Somerset)
  • 24 January 1832 : he was granted the arms of Challoner and Bisse.
  • Bisse-Challoner arms:
Sable on a pale argent three escallops of the field and for the crest on a wreath of the colours on a mount vert two serpents entwined respecting each other proper the heads encircling an escallop inverted or
On a wreath of the colours out waves a demi-sea-wolf issuant proper holding between the fins a cross patée sble and the crest of Bisse as the same as in the margin here of more plainly depicted'
Sable on a chevron cottised between three cherubins Or as many crosses patées fichés of the field for Challoner'
  • Tottenham arms:
Gules three bars dancettée argent

Gallery

Family portraits

Buildings

Art

Heraldry and Arms and silver

Notes and references

Notes

  1. ^ Other names: Colonel Thomas Chaloner Bisse-Challoner; Chaloner Bisse Challoner; Colonel C. B. Challoner; T.-C. Bisse-Challoner; Mr Bisse Challoner; Colonel Bisse Challoner (by 1828); Thomas Challoner Bisse; Thomas Bisse; my nephew Chaloner.
  2. ^ He enrolled at Trinity College, Oxford on 26 March 1806, aged 17.
  3. ^ William Smith was under 21 in 1747 and appears from his lack of more major inheritance to have died young.
  4. ^ Blackhorse Yard, Holborn – was formerly the Three horseshoe brewhouse yard
  5. ^ 246 and 247 High Street, Borough, Southwark was inherited from his first-cousin, Valentina Aynscombe (d.1841)
  6. ^ 86 shares in Sun Fire Office worth £17,200 in 1872
  7. ^ 54 shares in Sun Life Office inherited, indirectly, from his maternal-great-grandfather Robert Smith (d.1748)
  8. ^ 9,000 preference shares in the Trent & Mersey Canal and the North Staffordshire Railway inherited from his maternal-great-aunt, Lydia Challoner (d.1803), (a 1% holding worth £20,250 in 1872)
  9. ^ He served in the King's Dragoon Guards – Cornet: 9 March 1809; lieutenant: 1 August 1811.

References

  1. ^ At least 200 acres was owned outright and passed to the succeeding two next generations, the rest seems to have been rented during his lifetime.
  2. ^ Matriculation date
  3. ^ Prerogative Court of Canterbury PROB 11/916/349
  4. ^ Painting of William Townsend
  5. ^ Monumental inscription in All Saints, Fulham
  6. ^ Image of Lydia Archived 19 December 2014 at the Wayback Machine Staffs Past Track. Retrieved 2014-12-19.
  7. ^ a b Love Song, Duet[permanent dead link] Arts Council. Retrieved 2014-12-19.
  8. ^ 20 Geo. II, c. 7
  9. ^ GM
  10. ^ Prerogative Court of Canterbury
  11. ^ The London Gazette, Friday, 23 January 1829, no. 18543
  12. ^ Army List, various dates.
  13. ^ West Surrey constituency seat had a population of 102,856, of which 3,897 people were registered electors
  14. ^ The Farmer's Magazine, London, 1839
  15. ^ Documents of Horne Engall and Freeman Solicitors Records at the London Metropolitan Archives. Page 486 and others. Retrieved 2014-12-19.
  16. ^ (De Salis, 1939)
  17. ^ Art Prices Current, vol. 11, 1933, no. 1580

Other Sources

  • Select Illustrations of the County of Surrey: Comprising picturesque Views of the Seats of the Nobility and Gentry. Interesting remains, and with Descriptions ... , by George Frederick Prosser, and published by Rivington, London, 1828.
  • R. de Salis, Beneficiary Bisse : Colonel Chaloner Bisse-Challoner, heir and his heirs. London, 2008.
  • Edith Mary Johnston-Liik, History of the Irish Parliament 1692–1800, p. 422-3, volume six of six, 2002 (re. Tottenham family).
  • Alumni Oxonienses: 1715–1886, vol. 1, by Joseph Foster, James Parker & Co., London, 1891.
  • The Parliamentary Companion, for 1854, Charles R. Dod, London, Whittaker & Co., 1854.
  • Two scrolls from the College of Arms, and a schedule of Col. Challoner's estate in 1872.
  • Boyle's Fashionable Court and Country Guide, 1842, &tc, edited by M. Boyle, 290 Regent Street (five shillings), London.
  • Musgrave's Obituary, Harlean Society no. 44, six volumes, 1899–1901 (Sir William Musgrave, Bart.)
  • Rachel and Cecil de Salis, Notes of Past Days, Henley-on-Thames, 1939 (chapter 3, My Uncle Challoner, pps. 121–126).
  • R. G. Thorne, History of Parliament, The Commons 1790–1820, Secker & Warburg, 1986.
  • Walford's County Families, 1865.
  • The Mayors of Norwich 1403 to 1835, by Basil Cozens-Hardy, FSA and Ernest A. Kent, FSA, Jarrold and sons, Ltd, Norwich, 1938. (a note on Phillip Stebbing, page 101).
  • Seventeenth-Century Norwich, Politics, Religion and Government, 1620–1690, John T. Evans, Oxford, 1979.
  • Percy Millican, The Register of The Freeman of Norwich, 1548–1713, Jarrold, Norwich, 1934.
  • Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the High Court of Chancery: In the Time of Lord Chancellor Hardwicke [1736–1754], by John Tracy Atkyns, Philip Yorke Hardwicke, Great Britain Court of Chancery, William Newnam, Great Britain, Court of Chancery, Printed for J. Wenman, Oxford, 1781. (Frederick v Aynscombe, 1739).
  • Peter G. M. Dickson, The Sun Insurance Office, 1710–1960, Oxford, 1960.
  • Kim Sloan, 'A New Chronology for Alexander Cozens part II: 1759–86', The Burlington Magazine, Volume 127, No. 987 (June 1985), pp. 355–363.
  • Christie's London, British drawings sale, 15 June 1982, lots 5 – 10 (works associated with Charlotte Aynscombe (1760–1799)).
  • L.C.C., Survey of London, volume 22, Bankside, Sir H. Roberts & Walter Godfrey (editors), 1950.
  • Topographical Dictionary, London and its Environs, etc., by James Elmes, M.R.I.A., Architect; Surveyor to the Port of London; London. Whittaker, Treacher and Arnot, MDCCCXXXI (1831).
  • Sermons on Practical Subjects, by the late Reverend Henry Stebbing [d.1788], D.D., preacher to the Hon. Society of Gray's Inn, Chaplain in Ordinary to His Majesty, and Fellow of the Royal and Antiquarian Societies, London, with an essay by Henry Stebbing [1752–1818], printed for C. Dilly, in the Poultry, 1788.
  • The Lady Magazine, 1831. (Mr & Mrs Bisse Challoner were presented to the Queen at her birthday ball at Christ's Hospital.
  • The Registers of Wadham College, Oxford, part 1, 1613–1719, by Rev. Robert Barlow Gardiner, MA, FSA, George Bell, Covent Garden, 1889.
  • The Registers of Wadham College, Oxford, part 2, 1719–1871, by Rev. Robert Barlow Gardiner, MA, FSA, George Bell, Covent Garden, 1895.
  • Prerogative Court of Canterbury (P.C.C.) wills for, amongst others: Daniel Wight (1705); Elizabeth Aynscombe (1713); Philip Stebbing (1715); Jane Elliott (1718); Thomas Aynscombe (1740); Robert Smith (1748); George Challoner (1770); Charlotte Anne Aynscombe (1799); Lydia Challoner (1803); Rev. Thomas Bisse (1828); Valentina Aynscombe (1841); and Mary Barnard (1842). (Available on-line from P.R.O. Kew, aka National Archives).
  • The Virginia Water Picture Book by Ron and Dorothy Davis, Egham-by-Runnymede Historical Society, Surrey, 1989.
Honorary titles
Preceded by High Sheriff of Surrey
1838
Succeeded by

Warning: Default sort key "Bisse Challoner, Thomas Chaloner" overrides earlier default sort key "Davoren, Vesey Alfred". Category:1788 births [[Category:1872 deaths [[Category:People educated at Eton College [[Category:Alumni of Trinity College, Oxford [[Category:Deputy Lieutenants of Surrey [[Category:High Sheriffs of Surrey [[Category:People from Egham [[Category:Burials in Surrey [[Category:People from Virginia Water

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